Marker Logo HMdb.org THE HISTORICAL
MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Fort Washington in Prince George's County, Maryland — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Capital Guardian

The First Fort

 
 
Capital Guardian Marker image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, March 1, 2008
1. Capital Guardian Marker
Inscription. Troubles with Britain caused Congress in 1807 to authorize an improved system of forts along the Atlantic Coast to guard harbors, rivers, and seaports.

The first fort, Fort Warburton, was completed in 1809. Located near the river in front of the present fort, it was a small structure mounting 13 guns.

Destruction of the First Fort
During the War of 1812, the British, determined to retaliate for the American invasion of Canada and the destruction of York, planned to attack Washington, D.C. in August 1814. A British force landed from the Patuxent River and bypassed Fort Warburton on their march to the Capital. Defeating a small American force at Bladensburg, they captured Washington, D.C. on August 24. Meanwhile, six British warships moved up the Potomac and arrived off Fort Warburton on August 27, three days after the burning of Washington. The American commander, Capt. Samuel Dyson, abandoned and destroyed the fort on their approach, allowing the British to proceed upriver and capture Alexandria.
 
Location. 38° 42.738′ N, 77° 1.977′ W. Marker is in Fort Washington, Maryland, in Prince George's County. Marker can be reached from Fort Washington Road, on the right when traveling south. Click for map. Located in Fort Washington
Captial Guardian Markers image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain
2. Captial Guardian Markers
From left to right the "First Fort", "Fort Washington", and "The Endicott System." In the background is the entrance to Fort Washington, the masonary fort.
Park, just outside the visitors center / museum. Marker is at or near this postal address: 13551 Fort Washington Road, Fort Washington MD 20744, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. A different marker also named Capital Guardian (here, next to this marker); a different marker also named Capital Guardian (here, next to this marker); Battery Decatur and Disappearing Guns (within shouting distance of this marker); Fort Washington Park (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); Main Gateway (about 400 feet away); The Northwest Demi-Bastion (about 400 feet away); The Water Battery (about 700 feet away); Caponiere (about 700 feet away). Click for a list of all markers in Fort Washington.
 
More about this marker. On the left side of the marker is a drawing of an Artillery Soldier, 1812. On the right, a map details the location of Fort Warburton respective to the British land and river movements described in the text.
 
Also see . . .
1. Fort Washington. National Park Service site. (The site is undergoing some modification and some content is off line at this time.) (Submitted on May 28, 2008, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.) 

2. Fort Warburton
Capital Guardian Marker image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, December 7, 2013
3. Capital Guardian Marker
. The First Fort, National Park Service (Submitted on December 10, 2013, by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland.) 
 
Categories. Forts, CastlesWar of 1812
 
Old Fort Warburton Location image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, March 1, 2008
4. Old Fort Warburton Location
After its destruction, Fort Washington's water batteries were built over the remains of the old fort. Later Endicott System batteries were placed on top of the water batteries. Thus the ground in front of the fort was the site of three different fortification systems.
Artilleryman, 1812 image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, December 7, 2013
5. Artilleryman, 1812
Close-up of photo on marker
British Attack on the District of Columbia, 1814 image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, November 11, 2011
6. British Attack on the District of Columbia, 1814
Both arms of this two pronged attack on the District succeeded. Washington was captured and burned; Alexandria surrendered.
Close-up of map on marker
Fort Warburton image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, December 7, 2013
7. Fort Warburton
There is no known illustration or plan of the original fort. It was built, however, to the same plan as Fort Madison near Annapolis Maryland.
From a display in the Fort Washington Visitors Center
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia. This page has been viewed 1,041 times since then. Photos:   1. submitted on , by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.   2. submitted on , by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.   3. submitted on , by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland.   4. submitted on , by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.   5, 6, 7. submitted on , by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
Paid Advertisement