Marker Logo HMdb.org THE HISTORICAL
MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Alameda in Alameda County, California — The American West (Pacific Coastal)
 

Prehistoric Indian Mound

 
 
Prehistoric Indian Mound Marker image. Click for full size.
By Barry Swackhamer, November 24, 2014
1. Prehistoric Indian Mound Marker
Inscription. One thousand feet due west was a prehistoric mound, 400 feet long, 150 feet wide, and 14 feet high. The remains of 450 Indians with stone implements and shell ornaments were found when the mound was remove in 1908.
 
Erected 1919 by Daughters of the American Revolution, Copa de Ora Chapter.
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the Daughters of the American Revolution marker series.
 
Location. 37° 45.522′ N, 122° 13.857′ W. Marker is in Alameda, California, in Alameda County. Marker is on High Street near Santa Clara Avenue, on the left when traveling south. Click for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 1430 High Street, Alameda CA 94501, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 2 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Webster House (approx. 0.4 miles away); Clark Memorial Bench (approx. 0.8 miles away); Alameda’s First Church (approx. 0.9 miles away); Alameda City Hall (approx. 0.9 miles away); Alameda City Hall, 1895-96 (approx. 0.9 miles away); Alameda Lodge No. 1015 (approx. 0.9 miles away); Historic Alameda High School (approx. 0.9 miles away); Meyers House (approx. 1.3 miles away). Click for a list of all markers in Alameda.
 
More about this marker.
Prehistoric Indian Mound Marker image. Click for full size.
By Barry Swackhamer, November 24, 2014
2. Prehistoric Indian Mound Marker
This marker is located in Lincoln Park.
 
Categories. Native Americans
 
Prehistoric Indian Mound Marker image. Click for full size.
Alameda Historical Society, circa 1914
3. Prehistoric Indian Mound Marker
Ishi, the last of the Yahi tribe of Northern California, accompanied by Dr. Thomas Waterman and the Daughters of the American Revolution, at the dedication of the original plaque, Lincoln Park, June 18, 1914, that commemorates a Native American shell mound where implements and shell ornaments were found in the vicinity of Lincoln Park in 1908. - Alameda Museum caption
Note the different plaque.
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Barry Swackhamer of San Jose, California. This page has been viewed 342 times since then and 37 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on , by Barry Swackhamer of San Jose, California. • Syd Whittle was the editor who published this page. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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