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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Near Pensacola Beach in Escambia County, Florida — The American South (South Atlantic)
 

Battery 234

Spot, Plot, and Fire

 

—Fort Pickens —

 
Battery 234 Marker image. Click for full size.
By Mark Hilton, December 31, 2014
1. Battery 234 Marker
Inscription.
Hidden beneath this vegetated mound of Battery 234 were soldiers who figured out solutions to a pressing problem: Where should artillery crews aim the guns to strike an attacking ship? It took some teamwork. Soldiers in the nearby end towers would take simultaneous compass readings of an approaching enemy ship and telephone the information to the plotting room. There, soldiers used the data to plot a triangle on the table, calculated the distance to the target, and relayed their calculation to the gun crews for precision firing.
 
Erected by the National Park Service, Department of the Interior.
 
Location. 30° 19.302′ N, 87° 17.096′ W. Marker is near Pensacola Beach, Florida, in Escambia County. Marker can be reached from Fort Pickens Road 9.3 miles west of Pensacola Beach Boulevard (Florida Route 399). Click for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: Fort Pickens Road, Gulf Breeze FL 32561, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Battery Cooper (approx. 0.2 miles away); Chasefield Plantation Cemetery (approx. ¼ mile away); Battery Worth (approx. 0.4 miles away); Apache Prisoners
One of two Shield Guns image. Click for full size.
By Mark Hilton, December 31, 2014
2. One of two Shield Guns
(approx. half a mile away); Fort within a Fort (approx. half a mile away); Converting a Cannon (approx. half a mile away); Deadly Explosion (approx. half a mile away); Step Back in History (approx. half a mile away). Click for a list of all markers in Pensacola Beach.
 
Regarding Battery 234. The sweeping German victories in the spring of 1940 sent shockwaves through the American military, prompting the building of more coast defense batteries. Japanese victories in 1941 and 1942 only increased this concern. Yet by 1943 when this battery was completed, the tide of war had swung against the Axis forces and the battery was never activated. In 1976 the Smithsonian Institute provided the National Park Service with several rare artillery pieces, three of which are now mounted at Battery 234 and Battery Cooper.
 
Also see . . .  Fort Wiki article. (Submitted on January 2, 2015, by Mark Hilton of Montgomery, Alabama.)
 
Categories. Forts, CastlesWar, World II
 
Second Shield Gun image. Click for full size.
By Mark Hilton, December 31, 2014
3. Second Shield Gun
Second Shield Gun image. Click for full size.
By Mark Hilton, December 31, 2014
4. Second Shield Gun
Fort Pickens entrance sign image. Click for full size.
By Mark Hilton, January 1, 2015
5. Fort Pickens entrance sign
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Mark Hilton of Montgomery, Alabama. This page has been viewed 228 times since then and 2 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5. submitted on , by Mark Hilton of Montgomery, Alabama. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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