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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Near South Pass City in Fremont County, Wyoming — The American West (Mountains)
 

Lander Cut-Off on the Oregon Trail

 
 
Lander Cut-Off on the Oregon Trail Marker image. Click for full size.
By Barry Swackhamer, August 24, 2014
1. Lander Cut-Off on the Oregon Trail Marker
Inscription. In 1858, this ancient path, which had been used by Indians, explorers and mountain men as a short cut to the Snake River country was developed by Frederick Lander in to an alternate route on the Oregon Trail. What is commonly called the Lander Trail or Lander Cut-Off starts 9 miles to the southeast at Burnt Ranch (directly behind this sign), crosses the Sweetwater River 6 miles to the northwest, and continued along Lander Creek for 13 miles to the Continental Divide at Little Sandy Creek, the headwaters of the Pacific Ocean. From there it travels west across the Green River Valley, the Wyoming Range, and the Salt River Range before entering present-day Idaho. The Cut-Off rejoins the original Oregon Trail near Fort Hall.

This wagon road was favored by travelers for many reasons. The cut-off save as much as 7 days travel compared to the old route though Fort Bridger. avoided the expensive ferries across the Green River to the south, and bypassed the 50-mile waterless desert of the Sublette Cut-Off. Its longest waterless section was only 10 miles, and it had access to abundant grass and firewood. The Lander Cut-Off was used by an estimated 13,000 emigrants its first year, with 9,000 of them signing statements of support for the road at Fort Hall. While use dwindled after completion of the trans-continental railroad in 1869, the
Lander Cut-Off on the Oregon Trail Marker image. Click for full size.
By Barry Swackhamer, August 24, 2014
2. Lander Cut-Off on the Oregon Trail Marker
trail was still used by emigrants into the 20th century and played a role in the settlement of the Upper Green River Valley.
 
Erected by Sublette County Museum Board.
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the Oregon Trail marker series.
 
Location. 42° 25.374′ N, 108° 52.355′ W. Marker is near South Pass City, Wyoming, in Fremont County. Marker is on Dickinson Avenue (State Highway 28) near Lander Cut-Off Road, on the left when traveling south. Click for map. Marker is in this post office area: Lander WY 82520, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 6 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Meadows in the Sage (approx. 3.1 miles away); South Pass (approx. 3.1 miles away); First Masonic Lodge in Wyoming (approx. 4.8 miles away); South Pass City (approx. 4.8 miles away); Esther Hobart Morris (approx. 4.9 miles away); South Pass City: Wyoming’s Biggest Gold Boom and Bust (approx. 5.3 miles away); The Carissa Mine: Cycle of Boom and Bust (approx. 5.3 miles away); Oregon Buttes (approx. 5.3 miles away). Click for a list of all markers in South Pass City.
 
Also see . . .  The Lander Trail: National Road Building Comes to Wyoming - Wyoming State Historical Society. In 1857, with passage of the Pacific Wagon Road Act, Congress appropriated funds to survey and construct wagon roads. A segment of the first such national wagon road to be built in the West, now known as the Lander Trail, the Lander Road or Lander Cutoff, was named after the man in charge of its construction. (Submitted on January 7, 2015, by Barry Swackhamer of San Jose, California.) 
 
Categories. Roads & VehiclesSettlements & Settlers
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Barry Swackhamer of San Jose, California. This page has been viewed 230 times since then and 13 times this year. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on , by Barry Swackhamer of San Jose, California. • Andrew Ruppenstein was the editor who published this page. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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