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Washington in Washington, District of Columbia — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Logan Circle Just Ahead

A Fitting Tribute

 

—Logan Circle Heritage Trail —

 
Logan Circle Just Ahead Marker image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, November 30, 2014
1. Logan Circle Just Ahead Marker
Inscription. Some of the City's finest Victorian Houses ring Logan Circle. While the area appears on the L'Enfant Plan of 1791, it took Alexander “Boss” Shephard's improvements to make these grand houses of the 1870s and '80s possible.

Three Union leaders of the Civil War set up housekeeping on the new Iowa Circle, as Logan Circle was originally named. General Eliphalet Whittlesey of Number 8 worked for the Freedman's Bureau after the war and helped start Howard University. Captain Allen V. Reed, wartime commander of the USS Kansas lived at 6 Logan Circle; his daughters remained there into the 1930s. General Benjamin Brice, Paymaster general, lived at number 20.

Most notable was former Union Army General John A. Logan. On June 12, 1885, African American bands played and a crowd cheered as Logan arrived home at Iowa Circle. The recently re-elected U.S. senator from Illinois was known for promoting civil rights and establishing Memorial Day in 1868. After thanking the crowd, Logan invited all inside, where he reportedly shook a thousand hands. In 1901 veterans joined Congress to fund the circle's monument to Logan.

By 1930 nearby Howard University had attracted many affluent black families to Logan Circle. With U Street's “Black Broadway” so close, and segregation barring African Americans
Logan Circle Just Ahead Marker image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, November 30, 2014
2. Logan Circle Just Ahead Marker
from white-owned hotels, entrepreneurs converted some large houses into lodgings that catered to black travelers. Myrtle Williams, who opened the Cadillac Hotel at 1500 Vermont Avenue in 1941 explained, “We like to travel, but we could never find a decent place where a colored person could lay his head.” The Negro Green Book listed DC's welcoming accommodations.
 
Erected by Cultural Tourism DC, Logan Circle Heritage Trail. (Marker Number 7.)
 
Location. 38° 54.641′ N, 77° 1.75′ W. Marker is in Washington, District of Columbia, in Washington. Marker is on Vermont Avenue NW when traveling south. Click for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 1532 Vermont Avenue Northwest, Washington DC 20005, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. If These Mansions Could Talk (within shouting distance of this marker); Charles M. “Sweet Daddy” Grace Residence (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); Pratt House (about 400 feet away); Belford V. Lawson and Marjorie M. Lawson Residence (about 400 feet away); John Logan Memorial (about 400 feet away); Major General John A. Logan
Boss Shephard image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, November 30, 2014
3. Boss Shephard
Alexander “Boss” Shephard promoted Logan Circle's development in part because he owned land here.
Close-up of photo on marker
(about 400 feet away); 6 Logan (about 400 feet away); Logan Circle (about 500 feet away). Click for a list of all markers in Washington.
 
Categories. African AmericansMan-Made FeaturesWar, US Civil
 
General Elphalet Whittlesey image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, November 30, 2014
4. General Elphalet Whittlesey
General Elphalet Whittlesey A founder of Howard University.
Close-up of photo on marker
General John A. Logan & Family image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, November 30, 2014
5. General John A. Logan & Family
This 1887 tribute to the man who created Memorial Day sold to his admiring public shortly after his death. The engraving commemorates John A. Logan's achievements as a politician, military leader, and family man. The deathbed scene was a typical expression of mourning.
Close-up of image on marker
Death Bed Scene image. Click for full size.
Library of Congress, November 30, 2014
6. Death Bed Scene
Detail of Kurz & Allison card.
Benjamin Brice image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, November 30, 2014
7. Benjamin Brice
Early Logan Circle resident General Benjamin Brice.
Close-up of photo on marker
Generals of the Army of the Potomac image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, November 30, 2014
8. Generals of the Army of the Potomac
John A. Logan , for whom Logan Circle is named, posed in June 1865 with other generals of the Army of the Potomac from left, Horatio G. Wright, Logan, George G. Meade, John Grubb Parke, and Andrew A. Humphreys.
Close-up of photo on reverse of marker
Black Broadway image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, November 30, 2014
9. Black Broadway
Among the nearby Black Broadway attractions of the 1930s: Club Prudhom.
Close-up of photo on marker
Jackson's Tourist Home image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, November 30, 2014
10. Jackson's Tourist Home
13th and “O” Street N.W.
Close-up of photo on marker
The Negro Motorist Green Book image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, November 30, 2014
11. The Negro Motorist Green Book
This page from the 1940 Negro Motorist Green Book, shows listings for DC.
Close-up of photo on marker
  8 Logan Circle image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, November 30, 2014
12.   8 Logan Circle
This house was the home of General Eliphalet Whittlesey before it belonged to Belford and Marjorie Lawson.
  6 Logan Circle image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, November 30, 2014
13.   6 Logan Circle
This green serpentine stone mansion was the home of Captain Allen V. Reed.
  4 Logan Circle image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, November 30, 2014
14.   4 Logan Circle
John A. Logan's House
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland. This page has been viewed 325 times since then and 4 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14. submitted on , by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page. This page was last revised on September 7, 2016.
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