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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Concord in Cabarrus County, North Carolina — The American South (South Atlantic)
 

Cabarrus Black Boys Fountain

 
 
Cabarrus Black Boys Fountain Who Destroyed the British Ammunition Marker image. Click for full size.
By Tom Daoust, January 22, 2010
1. Cabarrus Black Boys Fountain Who Destroyed the British Ammunition Marker
Inscription.
In Memoriam
The Cabarrus Black Boys
who destroyed the British ammunition
May 17,1771
in defense of American Liberty

 
Erected 1916 by the Cabarrus Black Boys Chapter, Daughters of the American Revolution.
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the Daughters of the American Revolution marker series.
 
Location. 35° 24.57′ N, 80° 34.78′ W. Marker is in Concord, North Carolina, in Cabarrus County. Marker is on Means Avenue Southeast just east of Union Street South. Click for map. Near the old Concord Court House. Marker is at or near this postal address: 65 Union St S, Concord NC 28025, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 3 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. James P. Cook (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); Jefferson Davis (approx. 0.2 miles away); Barber-Scotia College (approx. 0.4 miles away); W. R. Odell (approx. 0.8 miles away); Jefferson Davis Camp (approx. 1.8 miles away); Warren Coleman (approx. 1.8 miles away); Red Hill (approx. 1.9 miles away); Charles A. Cannon (approx. 2.3 miles away). Click for a list of all markers in Concord.
 
More about this marker. The date on the Cabarrus
Cabarrus Black Boys Fountain Marker image. Click for full size.
By Tom Daoust, January 22, 2011
2. Cabarrus Black Boys Fountain Marker
Black Boys Fountain marker. It was wrong when it was first erected. The actual date was May 2, 1771. This is the correct date.
 
Regarding Cabarrus Black Boys Fountain. The Black Boys were white, but disguised themselves by blackening their faces with soot and dressing like Indians. It had nothing to do with anything racial. They just did not want to be recognized. They have been remembered in history as The Black Boys. Also the powder they blew up was not for British troops. But for Governor Tyron's troops who were putting down the Regulators.
 
Categories. War, US Revolutionary
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Tom Daoust of Concord, North Carolina. This page has been viewed 1,201 times since then and 60 times this year. Last updated on , by Bill Hallman of Concord, North Carolina. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on , by Tom Daoust of Concord, North Carolina. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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