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New Windsor in Carroll County, Maryland — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Birthplace of American Methodism

Robert Strawbridge † 1781

 
 
Birthplace of American Methodism Marker image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, August 31, 2008
1. Birthplace of American Methodism Marker
Inscription. The Pioneer Preacher of American Methodism purchased from John England, Sr. this house and farm March 2, 1773. A part of England's Chance and Brother's Inheritance, on which he had lived for 13 years since his coming to American 1760. Here he formed The First Class of Methodism John Evans, his wife Eleanor Evans, his nephew Job Evans, and Mary Evans his wife, Nancy Murphy and Mrs. Hoy, “Here Mr. Strawbridge formed the first society in Maryland and America.” From Asbury's Journal, May 5, 1801.

The First Society of Methodism

John Evans, William Durbin, Andrew Poulson, John England, William Daman, Benjamin Marcarel, George Havener, Richard Smith, Thomas Leakin, James Crawford, Robert Walker, William Snader, Thomas Donaldson, Daniel Stephenson, Philip Nicodemus, Jacob Cassell, George Logman, with their wives an some children and later Samuel Merryman, John Todd, Alexander and Mrs. Warfield, Hezekiah Bonham, John and Paul Hagerty and George Saxton.
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This Tablet was erected October 16, 1924 by The American Methodist Historical Society 160 years after the building by Strawbridge of the Log Meeting House – 1764 a mile southwest. The First Methodist Chapel in America.
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Erected
Birthplace of American Methodism Marker image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, August 31, 2008
2. Birthplace of American Methodism Marker
(marker is visible on the left of the left-most door on the porch)
1924 by The American Methodist Historical Society.
 
Location. 39° 31.624′ N, 77° 5.302′ W. Marker is in New Windsor, Maryland, in Carroll County. Marker can be reached from Strawbridge Lane. Click for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 2650 Strawbridge Lane, New Windsor MD 21776, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 5 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Robert Strawbridge House (a few steps from this marker); John Evans House, 1764 (within shouting distance of this marker); Robert Strawbridge (approx. ¾ mile away); Maryland History-New Windsor (approx. 1.2 miles away); Strawbridge Log Meeting House Site (approx. 1.4 miles away); New Windsor (approx. 1.5 miles away); Methodist Historical Marker (approx. 2.2 miles away); Headquarters Second Corps Army of the Potomac (approx. 4.6 miles away). Click for a list of all markers in New Windsor.
 
More about this marker. In 1844 a Baltimore Conference minister documented the location of the farm in Carroll County where Robert and Elizabeth Strawbridge and the couple's children made their home and livelihood. Following many decades of private visits to the site, in 1924 the first official pilgrimage was made to the property. In 1940 the Birthplace of American Methodism gained recognition
Evans House image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, August 31, 2008
3. Evans House
This 1764 log house was moved to this location from the Yohn farm (on MD 407 near MD 27) in 1979. John Evans was the first Methodist convert in America. Strawbidge's first class was meeting here by 1768.
as a National Methodist Shrine, and in 1973 the Strawbridge Shrine Association acquired the farm property - today's gateway to Strawbridge Country. — from a pamphlet available at the Strawbridge Shrine.
 
Related markers. Click here for a list of markers that are related to this marker. To better understand the relationship, study each marker in the order shown.
 
Also see . . .  The Strawbridge Shrine. Lovely Lane Museum. Commission of Archives & History, United Methodist Historical Society of the Baltimore Washington Area. (Submitted on March 8, 2015, by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland.) 
 
Categories. Churches, Etc.
 
Replica of the Log Meeting House image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, August 31, 2008
4. Replica of the Log Meeting House
Constructed in 1982 from colonial era logs.
Robert Strawbridge Monument image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, August 31, 2008
5. Robert Strawbridge Monument
Sculptor Charles McCullough, former artist-in-residence at Wesley Theological Seminary, portrayed the pioneer evangelist standing with his left hand holding a Bible and his other hand pointing to Heaven. The memorial statue was dedicated in 2004 with church leaders including Bishop James K. Mathews officiating. — Strawbridge Shrine Pamphlet.
Elizabeth Piper Strawbridge Monument image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, August 31, 2008
6. Elizabeth Piper Strawbridge Monument
Erected in 2007
Elizabeth Piper Strawbridge image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, August 31, 2008
7. Elizabeth Piper Strawbridge
“Wife of Robert Stawbridge, Mother, Farmer, and Witness for Jesus Christ…Died c. 1791, Buried beside her husband in the Bishops Lot Mount Olivet Cemetery Baltimore…Born in Terryhuga, Ireland, Active in Wesleyan Movement. Immigrated with Her Husband, and settled on Sams Creek.”
Robert Strawbridge<br>1732—1781 image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, August 31, 2008
8. Robert Strawbridge
1732—1781
“First Preacher of Wesleyan Methodism in America…Robert and Elizabeth Piper Strawbridge immigrated from Ireland to this area about 1760. His preaching soon led many to Christ. Her witness won the first convert John Evans.”
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland. This page has been viewed 230 times since then and 4 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8. submitted on , by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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