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Ogden in Weber County, Utah — The American Mountains (Southwest)
 

The Livingston Confectionary

268-270 - Historic 25th Street

 
 
The Livingston Confectionary Marker image. Click for full size.
By Barry Swackhamer, August 27, 2014
1. The Livingston Confectionary Marker
Inscription. This building was constructed at the beginning of the 1900s as a three story structure with commercial space on the first floor and boarding rooms on the second and third floors. The owner at the time of construction (circa. 1901) appears to have been John Contos, according to property records. Contos sold the property to Charles H. Smith in 1902. Smith sold the property to Sarah H. Wheelwright who owned the property from 1922 until 1944 when it was sold to Lettie Malan. In 1951 Lorna Malan Cole acquired the property from Mrs. Malan.

Occupants of the first floor retail space included: S & R Livingston Confectionery (1901); Paul A. Gysin Barber Shop (1904-1906); The Mexican Chili Parlor/Pullman Bar (1907-1913); and several grocery stores. From as early as 1904, the second and third floors were operated as boarding rooms by Dora Belle Topham (aka Belle London), Ogden Cityís most notorious “Madam” of the time period and her husband, Thomas Topham. They operated under the name “The Fashion Rooms”. After 1914, various women continued to lease the rooms until 1949, at which time Lettie Malan leased the building to Otto Waldron and E.J. Doherty who leased the rooming house and hotel under terms which required it to be used “to conduct only legitimate and lawful business”.

This building
The Livingston Confectionary Marker image. Click for full size.
By Barry Swackhamer, August 27, 2014
2. The Livingston Confectionary Marker
is an example of Commercial Vernacular architecture style. Is is a one-story building with a replicated historic storefront. The original building was a three-story brick structure before a fire burned it circa. (1960). The one-story building that remains has two storefront entrances made of wood with traditional transom windows and kickplates.
 
Erected 1998 by Ogden City Landmarks Commission.
 
Location. 41° 13.25′ N, 111° 58.441′ W. Marker is in Ogden, Utah, in Weber County. Marker is on 25th Street (East 2500 South) near Grant Avenue, on the left when traveling east. Click for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 270 25th Street, Ogden UT 84401, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. The Palace Billiard Hall (here, next to this marker); Gasberg Building (a few steps from this marker); The Solomon C. Stephens Building (a few steps from this marker); Union Restaurant and Switch European Lodgings (within shouting distance of this marker); Creston Hotel (within shouting distance of this marker); London Ice Cream Parlor (within shouting distance of this marker); Kansas City Liquor House (within shouting distance of this marker); Davenport Saloon (within shouting distance of this marker). Click for a list of all markers in Ogden.
 
Also see . . .  A History of Violence: Ogdenís 25th Street - Utah Stories. The completion of the Transcontinental Railroad marked the beginning of Ogdenís 19th-century boom, especially Ogdenís 25th Street. Dubbed the notorious “Two Bit Street,” it was too rough even, reportedly, for Al Capone.
There are three primary “moments” in Historic 25th Streetís history. The first was from the time the Golden Spike was driven until roughly 1905. Prohibition marked a second period, and the third was when Prohibition was repealed.
(Submitted on February 28, 2015, by Barry Swackhamer of San Jose, California.) 
 
Additional keywords. prostitution
 
Categories. Industry & Commerce
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Barry Swackhamer of San Jose, California. This page has been viewed 176 times since then and 25 times this year. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on , by Barry Swackhamer of San Jose, California. • Andrew Ruppenstein was the editor who published this page. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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