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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Baltimore, Maryland — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Overlea Waiting Station

 
 
Overlea Waiting Station Marker image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, January 17, 2015
1. Overlea Waiting Station Marker
Inscription. The first streetcar service to Overlea began on July 14, 1903. Overlea and many other Baltimore suburbs developed when streetcar lines were extended from downtown. These lines allowed workers to live away from the noise and crowds of the city and commute rapidly to and from their jobs in city offices of factories. Soon after the completion of the Overlea streetcar line, hundreds of houses and cottages were built on streets off Belair Road.

The Overlea Waiting Station was built in 1917 at the turnaround of the Number 15 Belair streetcar line. Waiting stations were found on nearly all suburban streetcar lines but most are gone. The Overlea Waiting Station served passengers and crews through the end of the streetcar era.
 
Erected by The Maryland Transit Administration (MTA).
 
Location. 39° 21.418′ N, 76° 31.706′ W. Marker is in Baltimore, Maryland. Marker can be reached from the intersection of Belair Road (U.S. 1) and West Overlea Road, on the right. Click for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 6859-6899 Belair Road, Baltimore MD 21206, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 5 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Women's Suffrage (within shouting distance of this marker); Taylorís Chapel
Overlea Waiting Station Marker<br>Panel 2 image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, January 17, 2015
2. Overlea Waiting Station Marker
Panel 2
(approx. 2.6 miles away); Furley Hall (approx. 2.9 miles away); Montebello (approx. 3.6 miles away); The Joppa Road (approx. 3.8 miles away); Mounted Messengers (approx. 4 miles away); Indian Rock (approx. 4 miles away); The First Orems Schools (approx. 4.3 miles away). Click for a list of all markers in Baltimore.
 
Also see . . .  Overlea Waiting Station (Overlea Trolley Shelter). (PDF) Maryland Inventory of Historic Places. (Submitted on March 8, 2015, by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland.) 
 
Categories. Railroads & StreetcarsRoads & Vehicles
 
Overlea Waiting Station Markers image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, January 17, 2015
3. Overlea Waiting Station Markers
Overlea Waiting Station Markers image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, January 17, 2015
4. Overlea Waiting Station Markers
Streetcar Turnaround at Overlea, 1920s. image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, January 17, 2015
5. Streetcar Turnaround at Overlea, 1920s.
Open lots show that the Overlea community was not yet completely developed. Overlea Waiting Station is at the far left.
Close-up of photo on marker
Overlea Waiting Station, 1925 image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, January 17, 2015
6. Overlea Waiting Station, 1925
Close-up of photo on marker
Aerial view of Overlea, 1923. image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, January 17, 2015
7. Aerial view of Overlea, 1923.
The Overlea Waiting Station is in the center foreground across Belair Road from the Overlea Bank (present First Union Bank). A streetcar is approaching the station on tracks in the middle of Belair Road, while two other cars are parked behind the station. The Rosedale neighborhood at the top of the photograph, was open farmland.
Detail of photo on marker
PCC Streetcar at the Overlea Waiting Station. image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, January 17, 2015
8. PCC Streetcar at the Overlea Waiting Station.
Because of its poor condition, the station was demolished in 1998. The design of the present building is based on the original station. Behind this building is a trolley pole once used to carry the overhead wires that provided electrical power to the streetcars.
Close-up of photo on marker
Semi-Convertible image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, January 17, 2015
9. Semi-Convertible
Early Streetcars on Number 15 Overlea Line were called Semi-convertibles. In warm weather, the windows of the cars could be raised into pockets in the roof. These dapper crewmen welcomed Overlea riders aboard their semi-convertible.
Close-up of photo on marker
Interior of a PCC image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, January 17, 2015
10. Interior of a PCC
In 1940, Presidents Conference Cars (PCCs) were introduced on the Route 15 Overlea streetcar line. PCCs were used until the end of the streetcar service in Baltimore.
Close-up of photo on marker
The End of an Era. image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, January 17, 2015
11. The End of an Era.
A PCC passes a new GM coach 2007 in front of the York Road carhouse shortly before the changeover from streetcars to buses. The Number 15 Overlea line and the Number 8 Towson Catonsville line were the last streetcar lines to operate in Baltimore. Both were discontinued on the same day, November 2,1963.
Close-up of photo on marker
Route 15 Overlea Timetable. image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, January 17, 2015
12. Route 15 Overlea Timetable.
In the 1940s, the Route 15 streetcar line traveled between Overlea and West Baltimore Street. A trip the length of the line took 46 minutes.
Close-up of photo on marker
Overlea Bus Station image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, January 17, 2015
13. Overlea Bus Station
Overlea MTA Station image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, January 17, 2015
14. Overlea MTA Station
Overlea Streetcar Mural image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, January 17, 2015
15. Overlea Streetcar Mural
Kun King, Steve Stout, Billy Crenshaw, Chris Marx
July 2013
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland. This page has been viewed 550 times since then and 10 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15. submitted on , by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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