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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Hermitage in Davidson County, Tennessee — The American South (East South Central)
 

The Hermitage Landscape

1804-1821

 
 
The Hermitage Landscape 1804-1821 Marker image. Click for full size.
By Sandra Hughes, September 25, 2010
1. The Hermitage Landscape 1804-1821 Marker
Inscription. At a time when limited resources led to smaller dwellings, the distinctions between indoor and outdoor life blurred. When Jackson lived in the log farmhouse, this area buzzed with dawn-to dusk activity, sounds and smells. Cramped housing for white and blacks forced them outdoors for work and relaxation. Here the enslaved workers cooked and stored food, did chores, and socialized. Archaeological evidence shows that the enslaved kept the work yard between the farmhouse and kitchen swept clean of grass and debris, an African American cultural tradition.

During his years in the farmhouse, Jackson planted 100 or more acres of cotton every year. He grew vegetables and corn to feed his family and enslaved workers and other crops to feed the livestock. As Jackson’s finances improved, additional slave cabins and new agricultural building dotted the Hermitage landscape. In his first three years on the property, Jackson also built a 125-gallon corn-whiskey distillery and a cotton gin and press that brought in additional income.
 
Location. 36° 13.016′ N, 86° 36.672′ W. Marker is in Hermitage, Tennessee, in Davidson County. Marker can be reached from Rachel's Lane. Click for map. Located at the Hermitage historical site. Marker is in this post office area: Hermitage TN 37076, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers.
The Hermitage Landscape 1804-1821 image. Click for full size.
By Sandra Hughes, September 25, 2010
2. The Hermitage Landscape 1804-1821
No images exist of the early Hermitage landscape, but this photo of a Virginia cabin shows how a swept yard and outside shelving would have looked. No picture exist of the cotton gin Jackson built in 1807 and it is likely his gin and press went through two or three different incarnations. This print shows, a typical press for baling cotton and a gin house where the cotton seeds were removed and processed cotton stored.
At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. A home for Jackson’s Slaves (a few steps from this marker); A Future President's Home (a few steps from this marker); Abandonment and Preservation (a few steps from this marker); The Belted Galloway (within shouting distance of this marker); The First Hermitage (within shouting distance of this marker); Land Conservation at The Hermitage (within shouting distance of this marker); Field Quarter Trail (within shouting distance of this marker); Growing Cotton (within shouting distance of this marker). Click for a list of all markers in Hermitage.
 
Categories. Agriculture
 
The Hermitage Landscape 1804-1821 image. Click for full size.
By Sandra Hughes, September 25, 2010
3. The Hermitage Landscape 1804-1821
This painting by William Aiken Walker depicts enslaved cotton pickers. When Jackson purchased The Hermitage, trees still covered much of the land. By 1821, agricultural fields dominated The Hermitage landscape, coming very close to Jackson’s farmhouse, kitchen, and slave cabins. I wish you to say to my overseer, that I am on my return, and will expect that my house will be prepared in such a way as will prevent the northern blast from entering. Say further to him, to have as much hemp broke as will make a sufficient quantity of Bailing to Bale my cotton and set wenches to spin it. I shall want my Cotton for market on my arrival, say to the overseer to have the gin started. -Andrew Jackson on Hermitage Operations, December 31, 1815
Wide view of The Hermitage Landscape Marker image. Click for full size.
By J. Makali Bruton, June 14, 2015
4. Wide view of The Hermitage Landscape Marker
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Sandra Hughes of Killen, Usa. This page has been viewed 436 times since then and 15 times this year. Last updated on , by J. Makali Bruton of Querétaro, Mexico. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on , by Sandra Hughes of Killen, Usa.   4. submitted on , by J. Makali Bruton of Querétaro, Mexico. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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