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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Deanwood in Washington, District of Columbia — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

With These Hands

A Self-Reliant People

 

—Greater Deanwood Heritage Trail —

 
With These Hands Marker image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, April 19, 2014
1. With These Hands Marker
Inscription. Up the Hill to your left are several signature handcrafted houses, Beginning in the late 1800s, Deanwood attracted skilled black migrants, who freely passed on their know-how.

In the 1920s Jacob and Randolph Dodd built about 50 structures in Deanwood, including numbers 906, 910, 920, 925, 928, and 929 48th Street. They bought lots or built on those owned by white developers, often to designs of Lewis W. Giles, Sr. Randolph Dodd regularly trained, hired, and aided Deanwood's craftsmen. To save money, the Dodds installed windows only in the front and back of the houses. Owners sometimes cut side windows later.

Louis Jasper Logan worked as a brick mason and general contractor in DC, building homes for his family at 4905 Meade Street and 1000 48th Place. According to the family, Logan arrived from North Carolina in the 1920s with training from North Carolina A&T, “a peanut crop, and $100 in this pocket.” Logan parlayed these into success, “ led a humble life, yet died a millionare” known for his generosity.

Edward L. Wright of 47th Place, another self-sufficient craftsman, built Deanwood's first television set, trained other to make TVs and broadcast and citizen band radios. Andrew Turner's mechanical aptitude led him to become a Tuskegee Airman during World War II. Neighbors still
With These Hands Marker (reverse) image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, April 19, 2014
2. With These Hands Marker (reverse)
remember the day he made a detour to fly over the neighborhood.

Reverse

Long an Country Town at the edge of Washington DC's urban center, Deanwood was forged out of former slave plantations during decades following the Civil War. It became one of Washington's earliest predominantly African American Communities.

Greater Deanwood today emcompasses the historic neighborhoods of Deanwood, Burrville, Lincoln Heights, and Whittingham.

In the 1800s, much of Washington's development followed decisions made by city leaders and investors, who favored areas northwest of Anacostia. Land here remained relatively untouched, and many streets were unpaved into the 1960s. Because builders chose not to apply racial restrictions on who could buy here, African American migrants found Deanwood welcoming, affordable, and convenient. The pioneering National Training School for Women and Girls, founded by Nannie Helen Burroughs (whose portrait appears on each Deanwood Heritage Trail sign), attracted educators to the neighborhood. New residents often built their own homes and created communities where for years no one locked their doors, adults treated all children as their own, and children behaved accordingly. On this trail you will see rich parkland, handcrafted dwellings, and religious and social gathering places that have made Deanwood an oasis of
With These Hands Marker image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, April 19, 2014
3. With These Hands Marker
dignity and self-determination for generations.
 
Erected by Cultural Tourism DC. (Marker Number 8.)
 
Location. 38° 54.165′ N, 76° 56.019′ W. Marker is in Deanwood, District of Columbia, in Washington. Marker is at the intersection of 48th Street and Sheriff Road when traveling north on 48th Street. Click for map. Marker is in the side yard of 4803 Sheriff Road Northeast. Marker is in this post office area: Washington DC 20019, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 2 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. A Whirl on the Ferris Wheel (approx. ¼ mile away); Designed to Compete (approx. 0.3 miles away); Original Federal Boundary Stone NE 9 (approx. 0.6 miles away); Fort Mahan (approx. 0.9 miles away); In Honor of the Men and Women of Fairmount Heights who Served in World War II (approx. one mile away in Maryland); Fort Chaplin (approx. 1.1 miles away); Woodlawn Cemetery (approx. 1.2 miles away); Misery (approx. 1.3 miles away in Maryland). Click for a list of all markers in Deanwood.
 
Also see . . .  A Self-Reliant People. Greater Deanwood Heritage Trail, Cultural Tourism DC. (Submitted on March 14, 2015, by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland.) 
 
Categories. African AmericansMan-Made Features
 
Edward L. Wright in his electronics workshop on 47th Place image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, April 19, 2014
4. Edward L. Wright in his electronics workshop on 47th Place
Close-up of photo on marker
Cabin Cruiser image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, April 19, 2014
5. Cabin Cruiser
Wright shows granddaughter Angelique the cabin cruiser he built in his back yard around 1955.
Close-up of photo on marker
Captain Andrew D. Turner image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, April 19, 2014
6. Captain Andrew D. Turner
Tuskegee Airman pilot Andrew D. Turner who grew up at 1000 Westford Pl.(now 47th St.)
Close-up of photo on marker
Diane Turner image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, April 19, 2014
7. Diane Turner
Diane Turner at play near her family's home, 1023 49th St., a Giles-designed house constructed by the Dodd brothers on Dodd land.
Close-up of photo on marker
Odie House image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, April 19, 2014
8. Odie House
This brick house, was built about 1960 at 4601 Jay St. by Odie Williams, Sr. pictured here with wife Virginia.
Close-up of photo on marker
1009 46th Street image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, April 19, 2014
9. 1009 46th Street
Louis Jasper Logan built this apartment house at 1009 46th St.
Close-up of photo on marker
Louis Jasper Logan and His Wife Ruth Logan image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, April 19, 2014
10. Louis Jasper Logan and His Wife Ruth Logan
Close-up of photo on marker
Dodd Brother's Houses image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, April 19, 2014
11. Dodd Brother's Houses
The Dodd brother's houses at 906 and 910 48th St. can be found across Sheriff Rd. to your left.
Close-up of photo on marker
You Are Here image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, April 19, 2014
12. You Are Here
Please Note: Sign 1 is located at Division Avenue an Foote Street. To follow the trail, we recommend that you take Metrobus U8 (toward Capital Heights) to the stop at Nannie Helen Burroughs Avenue and Division Avenue, then turn right on Division Avenue and walk one block to sign 1. The Trail ends at Minnesota Avenue Metrorail Station.
Close-up of map on marker
Nannie Helen Burroughs image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, April 19, 2014
13. Nannie Helen Burroughs
Close-up of photo on marker
1116-1/2 48th Street image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, April 19, 2014
14. 1116-1/2 48th Street
These two photos taken in 1945 and 2008 (inset) show the Randolph-Dodd-built house at 1116-1/2 48th St., 1-1/2 block to your right.
Close-up of photo on marker
1116-1/2 48th Street image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, April 19, 2014
15. 1116-1/2 48th Street
928 48th Street image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, April 19, 2014
16. 928 48th Street
926 48th Street image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, April 19, 2014
17. 926 48th Street
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland. This page has been viewed 258 times since then and 26 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17. submitted on , by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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