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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Nashville in Davidson County, Tennessee — The American South (East South Central)
 

Samuel Allen McElwee

1858 -1914

 
 
Samuel Allen McElwee Marker image. Click for full size.
By R. E. Smith, September 2, 2007
1. Samuel Allen McElwee Marker
Inscription. Born a slave in Madison County, Samuel McElwee began teaching school in Haywood County at the age of 16. In 1882, he was elected to the Tennessee House of Representatives and one year later was graduated from Fisk University. The only African American elected from Haywood County, Samuel McElwee served three successive terms in the legislature, promoting uniform education and justice. In 1884 and 1888, he was a delegate to the Republican National Convention. After he was defeated for reelection by force of arms in 1888, Samuel McElwee moved to Nashville.
 
Erected by Tennessee Historical Commission. (Marker Number 3A 163.)
 
Location. 36° 9.979′ N, 86° 48.208′ W. Marker is in Nashville, Tennessee, in Davidson County. Marker is on Jackson Street, on the right when traveling east. Click for map. Marker is in this post office area: Nashville TN 37208, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Ella Sheppard (Moore) (within shouting distance of this marker); Carl Van Vechten Art Gallery (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); The Harris Music Building (about 400 feet away); Cravath Hall
Samuel Allen McElwee Marker image. Click for full size.
By R. E. Smith, September 2, 2007
2. Samuel Allen McElwee Marker
(about 400 feet away); Fisk Memorial Chapel (about 400 feet away); The Little Theatre (about 400 feet away); Fisk University (about 500 feet away); Thomas W. Talley (about 600 feet away). Click for a list of all markers in Nashville.
 
Also see . . .
1. McElwee, Samuel Allen (1857– 1914). (Submitted on January 26, 2008, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.)
2. Tennessee State Library and Archives - This Honorable Body: African American Legislators in 19th Cen. (Submitted on January 26, 2008, by R. E. Smith of Nashville, Tennessee.)
 
Categories. African AmericansEducationNotable PersonsPolitics
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by R. E. Smith of Nashville, Tennessee. This page has been viewed 1,716 times since then and 19 times this year. Last updated on , by J. Makali Bruton of Querétaro, Mexico. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on , by R. E. Smith of Nashville, Tennessee. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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