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Shiloh in Hardin County, Tennessee — The American South (East South Central)
 

Confederate Memorial

 
 
Confederate Memorial image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, 1991
1. Confederate Memorial
Inscription. (Back of Monument - Center):
The States of the South
sent to the Battle of Shiloh
seventy nine organizations of infantry
ten organizations of cavalry and
twenty three batteries of artillery

How bravely and how well they fought
let the tablets of history on this field tell

As a greeting to the living remnant of
that host of gray and in honor of its dead
whether sleeping in distant places or
graveless here in traceless dust
this monument has been lifted up by the
hands of a loving and grateful people

(back of monument - west side)
Erected by The to Honor The Memory Of The Men Who Served The Confederate States Of America

(back of monument - east side )
Let Us Covenant Each With The Other and each with those Whose Sacrifices Hallow This Field To Stand For Patriotism, Principle and Conviction As They Did Even Unto Death.
 
Erected 1917 by United Daughters Of The Confederacy.
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the United Daughters of the Confederacy marker series.
 
Location. 35° 8.41′ N, 88° 20.091′ W. Marker is in Shiloh, Tennessee, in Hardin County. Marker is on Corinth-Pittsburg Road, on the left
Main Plaque on Back image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, March 16, 2009
2. Main Plaque on Back
when traveling south. Click for map. Located between Cloud and Stacy Field on Shiloh Battlefield National Park. Marker is in this post office area: Shiloh TN 38376, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. A different marker also named Confederate Memorial (within shouting distance of this marker); 14th Wisconsin Infantry (within shouting distance of this marker); 5th Tennessee Infantry (within shouting distance of this marker); 22nd Tennessee Infantry (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); 15th Michigan Infantry (about 300 feet away); 58th Illinois Infantry (about 300 feet away); 12th Iowa Infantry (about 300 feet away); Prentiss Surrender Site (about 400 feet away). Click for a list of all markers in Shiloh.
 
Also see . . .
1. Battle of Shiloh. In the struggle tomorrow we shall be fighting men of our own blood, Western men, who understand the use of firearms. The struggle will be a desperate one.
P.G.T. Beauregard (Submitted on April 8, 2008, by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina.) 

2. Confederate Monument. Very detailed blog posting discussing the symbolism of the artwork upon the monument. (Submitted on May 1, 2008, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.) 
 
Categories. War, US Civil
 
Plaque on Back of Monument - East Side image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, March 16, 2009
3. Plaque on Back of Monument - East Side
Plaque on Back of Monument - West Side image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, March 16, 2009
4. Plaque on Back of Monument - West Side
Dedication Date Outside of the Steps image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, March 16, 2009
5. Dedication Date Outside of the Steps
Center Figures image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, March 16, 2009
6. Center Figures
The figure in front, representing the Confederacy, surrenders the wreath of victory to death (of General A.S. Johnston) with night looking over the other shoulder.
Figures on the Right Side image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, March 16, 2009
7. Figures on the Right Side
The statues here depict and infantry and artillery soldier, representing the first day's action, and appear vigilant, looking into the action.
Figures on the Left Side image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, March 16, 2009
8. Figures on the Left Side
Figures on the left depict a cavalry trooper and an officer. These are said to represent the second day's fighting, with the cavalry unable to act due to the woods, and the officer bowed in submission to the order to cease fire.
Relief on the Right Side of the Monument image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, March 16, 2009
9. Relief on the Right Side of the Monument
These figures represent the first day's fighting, with hope and courage, facing the battle.
Relief on the Left Side of the Monument image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, March 16, 2009
10. Relief on the Left Side of the Monument
These figures represent the second day's fighting, with heads bowed in sorrow for both the men lost (there is one less figure on this panel) and the victory so nearly won.
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina. This page has been viewed 1,080 times since then and 9 times this year. Last updated on , by J. Makali Bruton of Querétaro, Mexico. Photos:   1. submitted on , by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina.   2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10. submitted on , by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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