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Shiloh in Hardin County, Tennessee — The American South (East South Central)
 

Headquarters General U. S. Grant

Night of April 6, 1862.

 
 
Grant's Headquarters Marker image. Click for full size.
By Nick Kurtz
1. Grant's Headquarters Marker
Inscription. General Grant in his Memoirs says:
"During the night rain fell in torrents and our troops were exposed without shelter. I made my headquarters under a tree a few hundred yards from the river bank." The large oak tree referred to, standing where this marker now stands, was destroyed by cyclone October 14, 1909.
 
Location. 35° 9.031′ N, 88° 19.256′ W. Marker is in Shiloh, Tennessee, in Hardin County. Marker is on National Cemetery Road, on the left when traveling east. Click for map. In the National Cemetery, Shiloh Battlefield National Park. Marker is in this post office area: Shiloh TN 38376, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Shiloh National Cemetery (within shouting distance of this marker); 54th Ohio Infantry (within shouting distance of this marker); Camp of Powell's Battery (within shouting distance of this marker); Powell's Battery (within shouting distance of this marker); Battery H, 1st Illinois Light Artillery (within shouting distance of this marker); 55th Illinois Infantry (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); Army of the Ohio (about 400 feet away); Army of the Mississippi (about 400 feet away). Click for a list of all markers in Shiloh.
 
Regarding Headquarters General U. S. Grant.
Headquarters Marker image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, 1991
2. Headquarters Marker
Maj. Gen. Ulysses S. Grant (USA) Army of the Tennessee
Officially, the army in the field commanded by Ulysses S. Grant in the winter and spring of 1862, was organized February 17, 1862 into the "District of Western Tennessee." Therefore the army would be known as the "Army of the District of Western Tennessee," or the "Army of West Tennessee." This force would not be officially organized within the "Department of the Tennessee" until October 16, 1862, when Grant's army was designated the XIII Army Corps. Official designation of what became the permanent title "Army of the Tennessee," did not occur until December 18, 1862. At that time the army was organized into four corps: XIII, XV, XVI, and XVII. Semi-officially, the term "Army of the Tennessee" was first used in army correspondence two weeks following the Battle of Shiloh, on April 21, 1862 (O.R., General Orders No. 41). The use of this title is quite common on army correspondence and reports during General Henry W. Halleck's "advance on and siege of Corinth." For the next six months, this semi-official title was randomly used to note the identity of this Federal army, even though official correspondence and orders from Grant's headquarters still officially retained the "Headquarters, District of West (or Western) Tennessee" title. ... Stacy D. Allen Park Historian October 31, 1995
 
Also see . . .  Shiloh Battlefield, National Park Service
National Cemetery image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, 1991
3. National Cemetery
. Victory here permitted Ulysses S. Grant to launch a relentless nine-month campaign to capture “the fortress city” of Vicksburg and recover the Mississippi River. (Submitted on April 8, 2008, by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina.) 
 
Categories. War, US Civil
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina. This page has been viewed 991 times since then and 23 times this year. Last updated on , by J. Makali Bruton of Querétaro, Mexico. Photos:   1. submitted on , by Nick Kurtz of Littleton, Colorado.   2, 3. submitted on , by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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