Marker Logo HMdb.org THE HISTORICAL
MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Sardis in Henderson County, Tennessee — The American South (East South Central)
 

Doe Creek Church and School

Brothers against Brothers

 
 
Doe Creek Church and School Marker image. Click for full size.
By Don Morfe, April 22, 2014
1. Doe Creek Church and School Marker
Inscription. A classic example of the brother-against-brother feuds resulting from the Civil War began virtually in the shadows of the historic log Doe Creek Church and School. Hugh and Robert Kennedy established farms here early in the 1820s. When the war began, Hugh Kennedy’s son, John G. Kennedy, enlisted in the Confederate army, while his twin sons, David and Isaac Kennedy, joined the Union army. Five of Robert Kennedy’s sons---Robert, Samuel G., Shadrach Hugh, William G., and James D. Kennedy---as well as his sons-in-law, James M. Smith, Bill Nails, and Isham Gurley, served in the Confederate army.

During the war, Samuel G. Kennedy and James M. Smith were killed. Unionists here had warned James D. Kennedy and Bill Nails not to return if they fought for the Confederacy. After the war ended, Kennedy and Nails returned to Doe Creek, and Union sympathizers murdered both of them three miles from here at Wormly Branch. Robert Kennedy brought their bodies here for burial, thus creating a community cemetery where several other Confederate veterans, including Isham Gurley, were later interred. The arguing continued into the early 1900’s, when a descendant of Hugh Kennedy was killed by a descendant of Robert Kennedy, his wife, and most of his family were interred on these grounds as is Hugh’s son, Hugh J. Kennedy.

About 1870, Robert Kennedy donated

Doe Creek Church and School Marker image. Click for full size.
By Don Morfe, April 22, 2014
2. Doe Creek Church and School Marker
The marker is located on the grounds of the cemetery.
land, furnished logs, and provided oxen to move the logs here for a one-room church and school, where congregations met on Sundays and children took lessons during the week. The school served the community until the late 1940s. For 54 years Elmer Duck, Robert Kennedy’s grandson, taught here.

(Inscription under the photo in the lower left)
Partisans murdering civilians, Harper’s Weekly, Sept. 5, 1863.

(Inscription under the photo in the upper center)
Guerrillas on both sides stole horses from civilians, Harper’s Weekly, Dec 24, 1864.

(Inscription under the photo in the lower right)
Doe Creek Church and School before restoration-Courtesy Golden Circle Graphics.
 
Erected by Tennessee Civil War Trails.
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the Tennessee Civil War Trails marker series.
 
Location. 35° 28.164′ N, 88° 14.85′ W. Marker is in Sardis, Tennessee, in Henderson County. Marker is on Doe Creek Road. Click for map. Marker is in this post office area: Sardis TN 38371, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 7 other markers are within 15 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Doe Creek Cemetery (within shouting distance of this marker); Doe Creek School (within shouting distance

Doe Creek Church and School image. Click for full size.
By Don Morfe, April 22, 2014
3. Doe Creek Church and School
of this marker); Brownsport Furnace (approx. 10.7 miles away); Mills Darden (approx. 11.7 miles away); Forrest's Raid (approx. 13.5 miles away); The "Pea Vine"A Ghost Railroad / Parsons A Railroad Town (approx. 14.2 miles away); Battle for Lexington (approx. 14.7 miles away).
 
Categories. Churches, Etc.EducationSettlements & SettlersWar, US Civil
 
The National Register of Historic Places image. Click for full size.
By Don Morfe, April 22, 2014
4. The National Register of Historic Places
Tennessee Historical Commission-Doe Creek Church and School est. 1870
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Don Morfe of Baltimore, Md 21234. This page has been viewed 281 times since then and 7 times this year. Last updated on , by J. Makali Bruton of Querétaro, Mexico. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4. submitted on , by Don Morfe of Baltimore, Md 21234. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
Paid Advertisement