Marker Logo HMdb.org THE HISTORICAL
MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Seneca Falls in Seneca County, New York — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

The Great Lighthouse

 
 
The Great Lighthouse Marker image. Click for full size.
By Bryan Olson, May 24, 2008
1. The Great Lighthouse Marker
Inscription. Home to progressive thinkers and welcoming to reformist speakers, the Wesleyan Chapel was known as the “Great Light House.”

In 1843, amidst emerging local and national controversy over freedom of speech, the role of women, temperance, and the morality of slavery, a devoted few Seneca Falls residents formed one of the nation’s first Wesleyan Methodist congregations here. Committed to equality and free speech, the congregation offered their new chapel to reform speakers. In 1848, the congregation opened its doors to the First Women’s Rights Convention.

After the Civil War, the Wesleyan Chapel passed into private hands. Though never destroyed entirely, it was altered to serve as a theater, store, garage, and laundry. Still, Americans returned to the site to commemorate the anniversary of the First Women’s Rights Convention.

Today, the National Park Service preserves the remnants of the original chapel. Visitors from around the world come here to explore ideas of freedom, equality, and social reform.
 
Erected by National Park Service.
 
Location. 42° 54.643′ N, 76° 47.997′ W. Marker is in Seneca Falls, New York, in Seneca County. Marker is on U.S. 20 0.1 miles west of
The Great Lighthouse Marker image. Click for full size.
By Bryan Olson, May 24, 2008
2. The Great Lighthouse Marker
Mynderse Street, on the right when traveling west. Click for map. Marker is in this post office area: Seneca Falls NY 13148, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. A Courageous Call for Equal Rights (here, next to this marker); Women's Rights National Park (a few steps from this marker); First Woman’s Rights Convention (within shouting distance of this marker); First Convention For Woman’s Rights (within shouting distance of this marker); The Historic Business District (within shouting distance of this marker); Wesleyan Methodist Chapel (within shouting distance of this marker); The Village of Seneca Falls (about 500 feet away, measured in a direct line); a different marker also named The Village of Seneca Falls (about 600 feet away). Click for a list of all markers in Seneca Falls.
 
More about this marker. The upper right portion of the marker has a photo captioned: Women’s Rights leaders and descendants of organizers of the 1848 First Woman’s Rights Convention unveil a commemorative plaque during 60th anniversary celebrations in 1908.

The lower right portion of this marker displays two photographs of the Wesleyan Chapel in 1930 and 1979.
 
Also see . . .  Woman's Rights National Historical Park. (Submitted on June 7, 2008, by Bryan Olson of Syracuse, New York.)
Wesleyan Chapel image. Click for full size.
By Bryan Olson, May 24, 2008
3. Wesleyan Chapel
The Wesleyan Chapel was built in 1843. On July 19 and 20, 1848, the First Women's Rights Convention was held here. Even though Elizabeth Cady Stanton was the only one of the five organizers to live in Seneca Falls, the Wesleyan Chapel was well known to them all. The church was a local haven for antislavery activity, political rallies, and free speech events. The original red brick Wesleyan Methodist Church was sold by the congregation in 1871 and extensively altered by subsequent owners. When the site was purchased by the National Park Service in 1985, very little original fabric remained. The site today offers a unique display of the highlighted historic fabric of the original building.(NPS)

 
Categories. Churches, Etc.Civil RightsNotable Places
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Bryan Olson of Syracuse, New York. This page has been viewed 975 times since then and 21 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on , by Bryan Olson of Syracuse, New York. • Kevin W. was the editor who published this page. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
Paid Advertisement