“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Fairfax, Virginia — The American South (Mid-Atlantic)

Draper House


Draper House Marker image. Click for full size.
By Kevin W., June 7, 2008
1. Draper House Marker
Inscription. Built by Dr. Simeon and Catherine (Wilkinson) Draper on a lot leased from town founder Richard Ratcliffe, this is the second oldest home still standing in the Old Town Fairfax Historic District. Catherine's sister was Matilda Wilkinson, the daughter-in-law of Richard Ratcliffe. Later, it became the family home of the Drapers' daughter Maria Louisa and husband William Chapman. Chapman was the village tailor and later postmaster.
Erected 2007 by City of Fairfax, Historic Fairfax City, Inc.
Location. 38° 50.748′ N, 77° 18.249′ W. Marker is in Fairfax, Virginia. Marker is at the intersection of Main Street (Virginia Route 236) and East Street, on the right when traveling west on Main Street. Click for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 10364 Main Street, Fairfax VA 22030, United States of America.
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. A different marker also named Draper House (here, next to this marker); Ratcliffe-Allison House (Earpís) (within shouting distance of this marker); Old Town Hall (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); Pozer Garden (about 300 feet away); Fairfax Herald & Print Shop
Draper House and Marker image. Click for full size.
By Kevin W., June 7, 2008
2. Draper House and Marker
(about 400 feet away); Fairfax Hay & Grain Store (about 500 feet away); Nickell's Hardware (about 500 feet away); Ralston's Store (about 600 feet away). Click for a list of all markers in Fairfax.
More about this marker. Curiously this, the second oldest building in Fairfax is graced with this historical marker. The oldest building in Fairfax, the Ratcliffe-Allison House located two doors down, is not.
Regarding Draper House. This structure is currently a business in the City of Fairfax Historic District. Its Flemish bond brickwork, box-like appearance and large end chimneys are typical of Federal style architecture. Many of the structure's original out-buildings have been converted into shops.
Categories. Notable BuildingsNotable Persons
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Kevin W. of Stafford, Virginia. This page has been viewed 1,746 times since then and 79 times this year. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on , by Kevin W. of Stafford, Virginia. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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