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Barney Circle in Washington, District of Columbia — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

John Philip Sousa

 

—Congressional Cemetery —

 
John Philip Sousa Marker image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, April 8, 2015
1. John Philip Sousa Marker
Inscription. John Philip Sousa (1854–1932), known as the “March King,” grew up in Washington on G Street SE, between 6th and 7th. Sousa became a leader of the Marine Band in 1880 and served in this position for 12 years, leading band tours around the United States, as well as concerts at the White House, Capitol grounds, state dinners, and receptions. Sousa was praised by 5 presidents and wrote and contributed over 100 marches, 10 light operas, and other works. Musicians continue to play Sousa's music to this day, and bands from around the world come to play at his grave.
 
Location. 38° 52.873′ N, 76° 58.78′ W. Marker is in Barney Circle, District of Columbia, in Washington. Marker can be reached from E Street Southeast near Potomac Avenue and 18th Street. Click for map. It is at Range 77, Site 163s in Congressional Cemetery. Marker is at or near this postal address: 1801 E Street SE, Washington DC 20003, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. U.S. Arsenal Explosion Memorial (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); Barney at Bladensburg (about 300 feet away); "The Healing Poles" (about 300 feet away); General Peterson Goodwyn (about 300 feet away); Heroes of 1814 (about 600 feet away); Historic Congressional Cemetery (about 600 feet away); Elbridge Gerry (about 800 feet away); Seafarers Yacht Club (approx. 0.3 miles away). Click for a list of all markers in Barney Circle.
 
Also see . . .
1. John Philip Sousa. Congressional Cemetery. (link on marker) (Submitted on April 8, 2015, by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland.)
John Philip Sousa Marker image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, April 8, 2015
2. John Philip Sousa Marker
 

2. Wikipedia entry for John Philip Sousa.
“The Stars and Stripes Forever”

The United States Marine Corps Band performs the national march of the United States, written in 1909, 90 years later in 1999.
Via Wikipedia Commons.
“Semper Fidelis”

The United States Marine Corps Band performs the official Marine Corps march in 1909.
From an Edison Amberol cylinder recording dated 1909 via Wikipedia Commons.
“The Gladiator March”

Sousa’s first big hit (1886), performed by the U.S. Air Force Band in 1998 for their album Front & Center conducted by Colonel Lowell E. Graham.
Via Wikipedia Commons
“The Washington Post”

Sousa wrote a march for the newspaper in 1889. The United States Marine Corps Band performs.
Via Wikipedia Commons. Performance date not available.
(Submitted on November 5, 2016.) 
 
Categories. Arts, Letters, MusicCemeteries & Burial Sites
 
John Philip Sousa's Grave image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, April 8, 2015
4. John Philip Sousa's Grave

John Philip
Sousa

Lt. Com. U.S.N.R.F
Nov. 6 1854
Mar. 6 1932
Wreath & Baton image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, April 8, 2015
5. Wreath & Baton
John Philip Sousa image. Click for full size.
Wikipedia
6. John Philip Sousa
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland. This page has been viewed 442 times since then and 45 times this year. This page was the Marker of the Week Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6. submitted on , by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page. This page was last revised on January 27, 2017.
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