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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Concord in Middlesex County, Massachusetts — The American Northeast (New England)
 

Henry David Thoreau

 
 
Henry David Thoreau Marker image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, April 17, 2009
1. Henry David Thoreau Marker
Inscription. was imprisoned for one night in a jail on this site, July, 1846 for refusing to recognize the right of the state to collect taxes from him in support of slavery – an episode made famous in his essay “Civil Disobedience.”
 
Location. 42° 27.632′ N, 71° 20.981′ W. Marker is in Concord, Massachusetts, in Middlesex County. Marker can be reached from Monument Square, on the right when traveling south. Click for map. Marker is in this post office area: Concord MA 01742, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Jethro’s Tree (within shouting distance of this marker); The Milldam (within shouting distance of this marker); The Millpond (within shouting distance of this marker); First Town House (within shouting distance of this marker); The Wright Tavern (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); On this Hill (about 300 feet away); British Soldier (about 400 feet away); Roger Brown (about 400 feet away). Click for a list of all markers in Concord.
 
Also see . . .  Thoreau's essay "Civil Disobedience". (Submitted on April 10, 2015, by J. Makali Bruton of Querétaro, Mexico.)
 
Additional comments.
1. Thoreau,
Marker in Concord image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, April 17, 2009
2. Marker in Concord
slavery and the Mexican-American War.

A close reading of "Civil Disobedience" shows that Thoreau was keenly aware of the potential for the new territory gained in the Mexican-American War to allow more places where slavery would be permitted. He was also against the Mexican War on general principles, saying "...and a whole country is unjustly overrun and conquered by a foreign army, and subjected to military law, I think that it is not too soon for honest men to rebel and revolutionize. What makes this duty the more urgent is the fact that the country so overrun is not our own, but ours is the invading army."
    — Submitted April 10, 2015, by J. Makali Bruton of Querétaro, Mexico.

 
Categories. Notable EventsNotable PersonsWar, Mexican-American
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey. This page has been viewed 828 times since then and 35 times this year. Last updated on , by J. Makali Bruton of Querétaro, Mexico. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on , by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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