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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Springfield in Robertson County, Tennessee — The American South (East South Central)
 

An Army In Springfield

Federal Occupation

 
 
An Army In Springfield Marker image. Click for full size.
By Don Morfe, July 24, 2013
1. An Army In Springfield Marker
Inscription. For most residents, Robertson County was a difficult place to live during the war. After the fall of Confederate Forts Henry and Donelson in 1862, Union forces occupied the county and made the town of Springfield a military base, where they guarded local roads and the Edgefield and Kentucky Railroad. Federal troops used the First Presbyterian Church on Locust Street as a stable; damage from horseshoes can still be seen in this historic building. Relations between the soldiers and the residents were generally friendly at first, but by February 1863, citizens were complaining of misbehavior and thievery to Military Governor Andrew Johnson. During one horrific December 1864 day at Wessyngton Plantation, Union soldiers threatened and then shot the plantation owner while burning many farm buildings there.

Other important military activities also affected civilian life. In June 1861, Confederates established a major induction center, Camp Cheatham. It was named in honor of Gen. Benjamin Franklin Cheatham, whose ancestors were among the founders of Springfield. During the autumn of 1862, Confederate Gen. John Hunt Morgan’s cavalry raid destroyed the Dead Horse Trestle near Ridgetop. In 1863, Federal authorities recruited escaped slaves from local plantations and formed units of the U.S. Colored Troops (USCTs). In 1864, the 15th USCT
"You Are Here" map of the area image. Click for full size.
By Don Morfe, July 24, 2013
2. "You Are Here" map of the area
formed part of the Union garrison in Springfield.

“The house had been pillaged from garret to cellar, trunks broken, open(ed) & rifled, furniture chopped to pieces with axes, doors burst down, and your Grandma cursed and told if she did not give them 500 dollars, they would burn the house over here d__n old head.” — Jane Washington, Dec 18, 1864

(captions)
First Presbyterian Church Courtesy Robertson County Archives
Wessyngton Plantation Courtesy Robertson County Archives
 
Erected by Tennessee Civil War Trails.
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the Tennessee Civil War Trails marker series.
 
Location. 36° 30.522′ N, 86° 53.164′ W. Marker is in Springfield, Tennessee, in Robertson County. Marker is at the intersection of West 6th Avenue and Locust Street, on the left when traveling west on West 6th Avenue. Click for map. This marker is located in front of the Robertson County History Museum. Marker is at or near this postal address: 124 6th Ave W, Springfield TN 37172, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Robertson County Korean War Memorial (within shouting distance of this marker); Robertson County Courthouse
An Army In Springfield Marker image. Click for full size.
By Don Morfe, July 24, 2013
3. An Army In Springfield Marker
(within shouting distance of this marker); Fallen Confederate Soldiers (within shouting distance of this marker); Tennessee Light and Power Company (within shouting distance of this marker); Robertson County World War II Tree Memorial (within shouting distance of this marker); Robertson County World War II Memorial (within shouting distance of this marker); First United Presbyterian Church (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); Robertson County Vietnam Memorial (about 300 feet away). Click for a list of all markers in Springfield.
 
Categories. War, US Civil
 
US Post Office,<br>Now the Robertson County History Museum image. Click for full size.
By Duane Hall, June 3, 2015
4. US Post Office,
Now the Robertson County History Museum
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Don Morfe of Baltimore, Md 21234. This page has been viewed 424 times since then and 28 times this year. Last updated on , by J. Makali Bruton of Querétaro, Mexico. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on , by Don Morfe of Baltimore, Md 21234.   4. submitted on , by Duane Hall of Abilene, Texas. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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