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Victory in Saratoga County, New York — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
Saratoga Monument
 
Saratoga Monument Marker - Victory, N. Y. Photo, Click for full size
By Howard C. Ohlhous, June 24, 2007
1. Saratoga Monument Marker - Victory, N. Y.
 
Inscription. Triumphant from their spectacular victory in the Battles of Saratoga, American troops pursued British forces that retreated to these grounds. After a brief siege, the British surrendered, marched down this hill and laid down their weapons on October 17, 1777 - a crucial event in winning American independence.

One hundred years later - as America recovered from a divisive Civil War and opened its arms to millions of immigrants - Centennial celebrations focused on the "noble" Revolutionary War spirit to heal, educate, and guide the young country forward, and inspired local citizens to build the 155' granite Monument in honor of a hometown victory that helped forge a democratic nation.

"Let our hurrying crowd pause for a time before the monument... they will have rest of mind, of body, of nerves and above all, that they find incentive for noble action beyond." --Ellen Hardin Walworth, 1891

A climb to the top via a stairway of nearly 200 steps provides a panoramic view of the surround countryside. Visitors unable to make the steep climb may enjoy a look at a photo book of the Monument's restored features and views from its summit.
 
Erected by National Park Service U.S. Department of the Interior.
 
Location.
 
Marker and Saratoga Monument Photo, Click for full size
By Bill Coughlin, July 13, 2008
2. Marker and Saratoga Monument
 
43° 5.848′ N, 73° 35.541′ W. Marker is in Victory, New York, in Saratoga County. Marker is on Burgoyne Street, on the right when traveling east. Click for map. Marker can not be seen from the road. There is a parking lot near the monument. The marker is in the visitor kiosk, near the parking lot. Marker is in this post office area: Schuylerville NY 12871, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Victory Woods (about 400 feet away, measured in a direct line); Major Nathan Goodale (about 500 feet away); Saratoga Monument Association (about 500 feet away); You’ve Been Robbed! (approx. 0.2 miles away); a different marker also named Victory Woods (approx. 0.2 miles away); The Last Ditch Defenses (approx. 0.2 miles away); Burgoyne Hopelessly Surrounded (approx. 0.2 miles away); A Good Place to Set Up Camp (approx. ¼ mile away). Click for a list of all markers in Victory.
 
More about this marker. The illustration on the marker's lower left is, "from a 1897 Harper's Weekly," that "depicts the architect's vision of the monument."
 
Regarding Saratoga Monument. In the western niche of the monument is a life size statue of Colonel Daniel Morgan facing the area he took position to surround the British during the Battles of Saratoga.

In
 
Saratoga Monument Photo, Click for full size
By Howard C. Ohlhous, June 24, 2007
3. Saratoga Monument
 
the northern niche of the monument is a life size statue of General Horatio Gates facing the direction of the invading British Army from Canada.

In the eastern niche of the monument is a life size statue of General Phillip Schuyler facing the direction of his home next to the Hudson River.

The empty southern niche is for Saratoga hero General Benedict Arnold, symbolizing his later treachery to the American cause.

A Crucial American Victory

Here in the autumn of 1777 American forces met, defeated and forced a major British army to surrender. This crucial American victory renewed patriots' hopes for independence, secured essential foreign recognition and support, and forever changed the face of the world.

Saratoga Monument

The Saratoga Monument, a 155 foot high stone obelisk, is open for visitation. Begun on October 17, 1877 and completed in 1882, it was built by a group of private citizens who wanted to commemorate the surrender of the British Army under General Burgoyne. Given to the State of New York in 1895, the Monument would later be given to the National Park Service in 1980. Closed from 1987 to 2002, and having received several years of restoration work, the monument is open to the public during the summer.
 
Also see . . .
1. Saratoga National Historic Park. (Submitted on June 9, 2008, by Howard C. Ohlhous of Duanesburg, New York.)
 
Saratoga Monument Photo, Click for full size
By Howard C. Ohlhous, June 24, 2007
4. Saratoga Monument
 

2. Wikipedia entry for the Battle of Saratoga. (Submitted on June 9, 2008, by Howard C. Ohlhous of Duanesburg, New York.)
3. Laying of the Saratoga Monument cornerstone. An article originally published by The New York Times on October 18, 1877. (Submitted on June 10, 2008, by Kevin W. of Stafford, Virginia.) 
 
Additional keywords. Revolution Schuylerville Philip Schuyler Horatio Gates John Burgoyne Benedict Arnold Simon Fraser
 
Daniel Morgan Photo, Click for full size
By Bill Coughlin, July 13, 2008
5. Daniel Morgan
A statue of Daniel Morgan, who commanded the riflemen at the Battle of Saratoga, is on the west side of the monument.
 
 
Horatio Gates Photo, Click for full size
By Bill Coughlin, July 13, 2008
6. Horatio Gates
A statue of Commanding General Horatio Gates is on the north side of the monument.
 
 
Philip Schuyler Photo, Click for full size
By Bill Coughlin, July 13, 2008
7. Philip Schuyler
A statue of Gen. Schuyler is on the east side of the monument, looking towards his house in nearby Schuylerville.
 
 
South side of the monument Photo, Click for full size
By Bill Coughlin, July 13, 2008
8. South side of the monument
The south of the monument should have contained a statue of the last great general of the Battle of Saratoga, Benedict Arnold. Because he turned traitor later in the war, no statue of him was placed on the monument.
 
 
View From Saratoga Monument Photo, Click for full size
By Howard C. Ohlhous, June 24, 2007
9. View From Saratoga Monument
This is the view through the window safety screen high in the monument. The view is to the south, and the Hudson River can been seen in the upper left.
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on June 9, 2008, by Howard C. Ohlhous of Duanesburg, New York. This page has been viewed 2,915 times since then. Photos:   1. submitted on June 9, 2008, by Howard C. Ohlhous of Duanesburg, New York.   2. submitted on July 18, 2008, by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey.   3, 4. submitted on June 9, 2008, by Howard C. Ohlhous of Duanesburg, New York.   5, 6, 7, 8. submitted on July 13, 2008, by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey.   9. submitted on June 9, 2008, by Howard C. Ohlhous of Duanesburg, New York. • Kevin W. was the editor who published this page.
 
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