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Adams-Morgan in Washington, District of Columbia — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Embassy of the Republic of Lithuania

Mrs. Henderson's Favorite Embassy

 

—Adams Morgan Heritage Trail —

 
Embassy of the Republic of Lithuania Marker image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, April 19, 2015
1. Embassy of the Republic of Lithuania Marker
Inscription. You are standing in front of the Embassy of the Republic of Lithuania.

The Spanish Baroque style mansion is all that remains of what was once a duplex, or double, embassy building designed by George Oakley Totten for Mary Foote Henderson's exclusive embassy enclave here. The mansion was constructed in 1907-08. The left-hand portion was demolished and replaced in 1965 by a nine-story apartment house. Fortunately the original two pieces were constructed to be independent, so the removal of the left side did not imperil the right.

The building surfaces are carved limestone. As he did in the dozen other buildings he designed as embassies for Henderson, architect Totten looked to Europe for design ideas. The tower, carvings, and upper stories supported by arcades take after the Palacio de Monterrey, built in the 1500s in Salamanca, Spain. Totten and Henderson were responsible for 12 grand mansions designed for foreign legations on or near Meridian Hill. The Embassy of Lithuania is one of nine that remain.

In 1908 the Danish ambassador rented the building from Henderson, shortly after the Swedish embassy took up residence next door. The ambassador stayed until 1912. Until Lithuanian Envoy Kazys Bizaukas purchased the house from Henderson in 1924, a series of foreign and domestic diplomats rented the elegant
Embassy of the Republic of Lithuania Marker image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, April 19, 2015
2. Embassy of the Republic of Lithuania Marker
structure, giving parties that defined Washington's early 20th-century diplomatic scene.

Upon Henderson's death in 1931, her heirs discovered that after receiving $5,000, Henderson had refused any further payments from the Lithuanian government. The delegation occupied the residence for free until her heirs completed the delayed sales transaction.

In 2004 the embassy doubled the building's size with a rear addition for offices and conference space.

Marker produced by the Embassy of the Republic of Lithuania in cooperation
with District Department of Transportation and Cultural Tourism, DC.

 
Location. 38° 55.428′ N, 77° 2.196′ W. Marker is in Adams-Morgan, District of Columbia, in Washington. Marker is on 16th Street Northwest, on the right when traveling south. Click for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 2620 16th Street Northwest, Washington DC 20009, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Lithuania's March to Freedom (here, next to this marker); Life on the Park (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); A Hilltop for Heroes and Horse Thieves (about 300 feet away); Polish-U.S. Diplomatic Relations (about 300 feet
The Double Embassy image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, April 19, 2015
3. The Double Embassy
George Oakley Totten's double embassy in 1939. Only the right hand portion remains.
Close-up of photo on marker
away); Embassy of the Republic of Poland (about 300 feet away); Campus to Army Camps and Back Again (about 400 feet away); Mansions, Parks, and People (about 600 feet away); Visionary and Park Champion (about 700 feet away). Click for a list of all markers in Adams-Morgan.
 
Categories. GovernmentMan-Made FeaturesPolitics
 
The Palacio de Monterrey image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, April 19, 2015
4. The Palacio de Monterrey
Totten's inspiration: Spain's Palacio de Monterrey
Close-up of photo on marker
Mary Foote Henderson image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, April 19, 2015
5. Mary Foote Henderson
Embassy promoter Mary Foote Henderson was photographed at a horse show in 1915 with Colonel Robert M. Thompson, president of the American Olympic Association.
Close-up of photo on marker
The Lithuanian Consulate in Chicago, 1924. image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, April 19, 2015
6. The Lithuanian Consulate in Chicago, 1924.
Close-up of photo on marker
Ambassador Kazys Bizauskas image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, April 19, 2015
7. Ambassador Kazys Bizauskas
Lithuanian Ambassador Kazys Bizauskas leaves the White House after presenting his credentials, 1924.
Close-up of photo on marker
The Ambassador and the Princesses image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, April 19, 2015
8. The Ambassador and the Princesses
Ambassador Audrius Brüzga and Lithuania's delegates to the U.S. Cherry Blossom Festival host American and International princesses, 2009.
Close-up of photo on marker
Time Capsule image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, April 19, 2015
9. Time Capsule
President Valdas Adamkus prepares a time capsule to be placed in the embassy's new addition, 2007.
Close-up of photo on marker
Second Floor Dining Room image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, April 19, 2015
10. Second Floor Dining Room
The elegant arches and moldings of the Totten-designed embassy's second-floor dining room frame a table of refreshments.
Close-up of photo on marker
The Lithuanian Embassy image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, April 19, 2015
11. The Lithuanian Embassy
“Embassy of Freedom, 90 Years, 1924 - 2014”
George Oakley Totten image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, March 2, 2013
12. George Oakley Totten
Close-up of image on the “Life on the Park” marker.
Mrs. Henderson image. Click for full size.
Library of Congress
13. Mrs. Henderson
From The Washington Evening Star June 20, 1908. The article relates how Mrs. Henderson converted the Chinese Ambassador, Dr. Wu, to the fad of vegetarianism.
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland. This page has been viewed 306 times since then and 20 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13. submitted on , by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page. This page was last revised on January 28, 2017.
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