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Red Bank in Monmouth County, New Jersey — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Honorable Daniel J. O’Hern

(1930 – 2009)

 
 
Honorable Daniel J. O’Hern Marker image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, April 26, 2015
1. Honorable Daniel J. O’Hern Marker
Inscription.
It is with great honor, appreciation, and respect that NJ Transit Corporation
dedicated the Red Bank Train Station to the
Honorable Daniel J. O’Hern
(1930 – 2009)

Daniel J. O’Hern, a devoted son of Red Bank, served not only his town, but also his state and nation. He grew up a short walk from here, at 60 Locust Avenue. His attachment to this train station began when he commuted to Regis High School in Manhattan. In 1951, O’Hern graduated from Fordham University with honors. He served as a Lieutenant J.G. in the Navy during the Korean War. He graduated from Harvard Law School with honors in 1957 and then was a judicial clerk for U.S. Supreme Court Justice William J. Brennan, Jr. He returned to his beloved Red Bank where he practiced law and became a public servant. He was a Red Bank Councilman from 1962 – 1968 and Mayor from 1968 – 1978. Governor Brendan T. Bryne named him DEP Commissioner in 1978 and Chief Counsel in 1979. In 1981, Governor Bryne nominated O’Hern to the New Jersey Supreme Court, on which he served as an Associate Justice until 2000.

It was during his tenure as Mayor that O’Hern cemented his relationship with this train station. In 1963, O’Hern saw how the demolition of the original New York Penn Station, a breathtaking structure, demoralized the public. So
Honorable Daniel J. O’Hern Marker image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, April 26, 2015
2. Honorable Daniel J. O’Hern Marker
in the 1970s, when the State wanted to tear down this beautiful Victorian station, O’Hern successfully fought to preserve it because he believed in the words written by the New York Times that, “society will be judged not by the monuments we build but by those we have destroyed.”

O’Hern was a kind, humble, and courteous man. He was a man without enemies. His integrity, morality, and compassion knew no bounds. His life is a model of inspiration for each of us. And this train station is a reminder that one person can enhance the lives of many and make a stand for the betterment of all.

The Daniel J. O’Hern Station
Dedicated November 28, 2014

 
Erected 2014.
 
Location. 40° 20.914′ N, 74° 4.476′ W. Marker is in Red Bank, New Jersey, in Monmouth County. Marker is at the intersection of Monmouth Street and Bridge Avenue, on the right when traveling east on Monmouth Street. Click for map. Marker is located at the Red Bank train station. Marker is at or near this postal address: 175 Monmouth Street, Red Bank NJ 07701, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 2 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Gate Keepers Booth (here, next to this marker); Red Bank War Memorial (approx. 0.4 miles away);
Marker at the Red Bank Train Station image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, April 26, 2015
3. Marker at the Red Bank Train Station
The Victorian train station building can be seen behind the marker.
Harriet LaFetra (1823-1906) (approx. 1.8 miles away); Quaker Meeting House (approx. 1.8 miles away); 1941-2007 Red Bank Veterans Monument (approx. 1.8 miles away); Patriot Isle (approx. 1.8 miles away); This Sycamore (approx. 1.8 miles away); Christ Church (approx. 1.9 miles away). Click for a list of all markers in Red Bank.
 
More about this marker. A bas relief of Daniel O’Hern appears at the top of the marker.
 
Categories. Notable Persons
 
Red Bank Victorian Train Station image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, April 26, 2015
4. Red Bank Victorian Train Station
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey. This page has been viewed 232 times since then and 4 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4. submitted on , by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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