“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Lebanon in Wilson County, Tennessee — The American South (East South Central)

Neddy Jacobs Cabin

Neddy Jacobs Cabin Marker image. Click for full size.
By David Seibert, May 25, 2009
1. Neddy Jacobs Cabin Marker
Inscription. Prior to 1780, the land that is now the Historic Lebanon Town Square was claimed by William Gosney. It was part of 640 acres surrounding the gushing spring, and here he built a cabin. After his death, the land was sold in 1793 by his heirs to James Menees.

In 1801 the Tennessee State Legislature appointed five commissioners to determine the site for a County Seat for Wilson County. They chose this site around the spring and cabin. When Lebanon was founded and lots were sold on August 16, 1802, there was one family living in a cabin near the spring around which the town was laid out. Edward (Neddy) Jacobs and his Lumbee Indian wife had moved into the cabin in 1800. Neddy, an Irishman who had shipwrecked off the coast of North Carolina, was taken in by the Lumbee Indians. There he met his wife, Layula, before moving westward to Tennessee.

Neddy later built a new cabin for his family, but after his death, Layula left and moved west with a band of Cherokee who passed through Lebanon on the Trail of Tears.
Location. 36° 12.506′ N, 86° 17.482′ W. Marker is in Lebanon, Tennessee, in Wilson County. Marker is at the intersection of North Cumberland Street (U.S. 231) and West Main Street (Tennessee Route 24), on the right when traveling south
Neddy Jacobs Cabin and Marker image. Click for full size.
By David Seibert, May 25, 2009
2. Neddy Jacobs Cabin and Marker
The cabin was built prior to 1800.
on North Cumberland Street. Click for map. The marker stands in the northwest section of the Historic Lebanon Town Square. Marker is at or near this postal address: 106 N Cumberland St, Lebanon TN 37087, United States of America.
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. History of the Logs Used in this Cabin (here, next to this marker); Lebanon (a few steps from this marker); Battle of Lebanon (within shouting distance of this marker); Confederate Veterans and Robert H. Hatton Memorial (within shouting distance of this marker); Wilson County Courthouses (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); Robert Looney Caruthers (approx. 0.2 miles away); Caruthers Hall (approx. mile away); Site of Robert H. Hatton Home (approx. 0.4 miles away). Click for a list of all markers in Lebanon.
Categories. Native AmericansSettlements & Settlers
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by David Seibert of Sandy Springs, Georgia. This page has been viewed 384 times since then and 74 times this year. Last updated on , by J. Makali Bruton of San Salvador, El Salvador. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on , by David Seibert of Sandy Springs, Georgia. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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