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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Selma in Dallas County, Alabama — The American South (East South Central)
 

I Had A Dream

Dr. Martin L. King Jr.

 
 
I Had A Dream Marker image. Click for full size.
By Tim & Renda Carr, November 6, 2010
1. I Had A Dream Marker
Inscription. The demonstration that led to the most important advance in civil rights for millions of Black Americans began here March 21, 1965. It was the 50-mile march from Selma to Montgomery, Alabama, the State Capital.

Defying threats of death, Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., led 400 Black and White Americans on the longest, largest, most dramatic march of his 13-year career.

It gave southern Blacks the right as citizens to cast a ballot and help determine and help operate the government under which they live. In the succeeding 10 years, Black voters increased from 1,463,000 to 3,845,000 and Black elected officials from 72 to 2,568 in the states affected. Hundreds of others were named to public posts. Blacks attained a more equitable share of tax benefits and won greater self esteem and respect from others as voting citizens. All these things flowed from what began here.

This is a tribute to those who planned, encouraged, marched, were jailed, beaten and died to change Black Americans from second class to first class citizens.

They Gave Their Lives
to overcome injustice and secure the right to
vote for all Americans.

James J. Reeb
Boston

Viola Gregg Liuzzo
Detroit

Jimmy Lee Jackson
Marion, Alabama

Dedicated
August
I Had A Dream Marker In Front Of The Brown Chapel AME Church image. Click for full size.
By Tim & Renda Carr, November 6, 2010
2. I Had A Dream Marker In Front Of The Brown Chapel AME Church
11, 1979

This was the
starting point
of the march
from Selma
to Montgomery
March 21, 1965

Project Conceived and
Edited by Executive
Secretary Robert H. Miller
1896-1979

“…Let Us March On Til Victory Is Won”
James Weldon Johnson
“Lift Every Voice and Sing"

 
Erected 1979 by National Funeral Directors And Morticians Association.
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the Martin Luther King, Jr., and the National Historic Landmarks marker series.
 
Location. 32° 24.745′ N, 87° 0.983′ W. Marker is in Selma, Alabama, in Dallas County. Marker is on Martin Luther King Street north of Selma Avenue, on the right when traveling north. Click for map. Marker located in front of the Brown Chapel AME Church. Marker is at or near this postal address: 410 Martin Luther King Street, Selma AL 36703, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. In Honor of James Joseph Reeb (approx. 0.3 miles away); Selma Navy Yard and Ordnance Works (approx. 0.3 miles away); Arsenal Anvil (approx. 0.3 miles away); Highlights of Selma History / William Rufus DeVane King 1786-1853
Brown Chapel AME Church Designated A National Historic Landmark 1997 image. Click for full size.
By Tim & Renda Carr, November 6, 2010
3. Brown Chapel AME Church Designated A National Historic Landmark 1997
(approx. 0.3 miles away); VII In. Brooke Rifle (approx. 0.3 miles away); Sgt Robert Weakley Patton (approx. 0.3 miles away); Temple Mishkan Israel (approx. 0.4 miles away); St. James Hotel (approx. 0.4 miles away). Click for a list of all markers in Selma.
 
Also see . . .  The Selma to Montgomery National Historic Trail by The National Park Service. (Submitted on November 11, 2010, by Timothy Carr of Birmingham, Alabama.)
 
Additional keywords. The "I Have a Dream" Speech [1963]. Voting Rights Act [1965]. Brown Chapel African Methodist Episcopal Church NHL.
 
Categories. African AmericansCivil RightsNotable Persons
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Timothy Carr of Birmingham, Alabama. This page has been viewed 1,683 times since then and 79 times this year. Last updated on , by J. Makali Bruton of Querétaro, Mexico. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on , by Timothy Carr of Birmingham, Alabama. • Andrew Ruppenstein was the editor who published this page. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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