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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Near Rich Creek in Giles County, Virginia — The American South (Mid-Atlantic)
 

New River

 
 
New River Marker image. Click for full size.
By J. J. Prats, May 30, 2015
1. New River Marker
Inscription. The New River is estimated to be more than 100 million years old, making it one of the oldest rivers in the world. It is a remnant of the prehistoric Teays River. The first written documentation of the New River was by explorers Thomas Batte and Robert Hallow. A Totera Indian guide led them there on 13 Sept. 1671. First called Wood’s River, most likely for Abraham Wood, who launched the expedition, it became known as the New River by the middle of the 18th century. The New River is known for its treacherous current and stretches more than 300 miles through Virginia, North Carolina, and West Virginia.
 
Erected 2000 by Department of Historic Resources. (Marker Number KG-19.)
 
Location. 37° 22.174′ N, 80° 49.161′ W. Marker is near Rich Creek, Virginia, in Giles County. Marker is on Virginia Avenue (U.S. 460), on the right when traveling east. Click for map. It can only be seen from the southbound lanes of US 460. It is at the Rich Creek Public Boat Ramp just south of Rich Creek. Marker is in this post office area: Rich Creek VA 24147, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 6 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Giles County / West Virginia (approx. 2.1 miles away); Peterstown
New River Marker image. Click for full size.
By J. J. Prats, May 30, 2015
2. New River Marker
US 360 eastbound is on the left, and the road down to the boat ramp is on the right. Wolf Creek (New River) can be glimpsed to the right of the No Parking sign. The eastbound lanes of US 360 were built on the Virginian Railway’s tracks between Glen Lyn and Narrows.
(approx. 2.2 miles away in West Virginia); Home of the Jones Diamond (approx. 2.2 miles away in West Virginia); Narrows (approx. 2.6 miles away); West Virginia / Giles County Virginia (approx. 2.7 miles away); First Court of Giles County (approx. 4.2 miles away); Woods’ Fort (approx. 5.5 miles away in West Virginia); Pearisburg (approx. 5.5 miles away).
 
Related markers. Click here for a list of markers that are related to this marker. It is a list of other New River markers.
 
Also see . . .  Wikipedia entry for New River. “It was named the New River because it was not known to early Atlantic Coast explorers. Despite its name, the New River is one of the five oldest rivers in the world geologically, and the only non-tidal river that crosses the Appalachian Mountains.”
...
“This low-level crossing of the Appalachians, many millions of years old, has long been a biogeographical corridor allowing numerous species of plants and animals to spread between the lowlands of the American East Coast and those of the Midwest; other unusual kinds of plants occur on the gorge’s cliffs or rim-top ledges. Portions of this corridor are now also used by various railroads
View of Wolf Creek (New River) from the Boat Ramp Looking Upstream image. Click for full size.
By J. J. Prats, May 30, 2015
3. View of Wolf Creek (New River) from the Boat Ramp Looking Upstream
The Norfolk Southern Railway tracks are on the distant bank. These tracks were originally laid by the Norfolk & Western Railway.
and highways, and some segments of the river have been dammed for hydroelectric power production.” (Submitted on June 4, 2015.) 
 
Categories. Natural Features
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by J. J. Prats of Springfield, Virginia. This page has been viewed 220 times since then and 5 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on , by J. J. Prats of Springfield, Virginia. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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