“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Fincastle in Botetourt County, Virginia — The American South (Mid-Atlantic)


Santillane Marker image. Click for full size.
By J. J. Prats, May 30, 2015
1. Santillane Marker
Inscription. Near here is Santillane, one of Botetourt County’s most distinguished properties. The Greek Revival house sits on a tract of land originally owned by Colonel George Hancock, a member of the United States Congress from 1793-1797. In 1808 Hancock’s daughter, Judith, married General William Clark. Clark served from 1803 to 1806 as a leader of Thomas Jefferson’s famous Lewis and Clark expedition which was instrumental in opening the West for American settlement.
Erected 1990 by Department of Historic Resources. (Marker Number D-32.)
Location. 37° 29.6′ N, 79° 52.684′ W. Marker is in Fincastle, Virginia, in Botetourt County. Marker is at the intersection of Botetourt Road (U.S. 220) and Houseman Street (County Route 1211), on the left when traveling north on Botetourt Road. Click for map. Marker is in this post office area: Fincastle VA 24090, United States of America.
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 7 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Fincastle (approx. 0.4 miles away); Botetourt County Courthouse Fire (approx. 0.4 miles away); Breckinridge Mill (approx. 1.8 miles away); Fort William (approx. 2.7 miles
Santillane Marker image. Click for full size.
By J. J. Prats, May 30, 2015
2. Santillane Marker
away); Coming of the Railroad (approx. 4 miles away); Roanoke Valley Baptist Association (approx. 4 miles away); Greenfield (approx. 4.3 miles away); Daleville College (approx. 6.5 miles away). Click for a list of all markers in Fincastle.
Regarding Santillane. THIS IS A PRIVATE RESIDENCE. Wikipedia: Santillane is a historic home located near Fincastle, Botetourt County, Virginia. It was built about 1835, and consists of a two-story high, three bay by four bay, main block with a one-story, rear kitchen wing. It is constructed of brick and is in the Greek Revival style. The house has a shallow hipped roof and tetrastyle two-story front portico dated to the early 20th century. Also on the property is a contributing stone spring house. The house stands on a tract purchased by Colonel George Hancock (1754–1820) in 1795. The kitchen wing may date to his period of ownership. It was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1974.
Also see . . .  1974 NRHP Nomination Form (PDF). “Santillane is one of the most distinguished homesteads in Botetourt County. Although it is in the fashionable style of the period, the Greek Revival house is architecturally conservative, and has little decorative
Santillane image. Click for full size.
Via Virginia Department of Historic Resources
3. Santillane
trim. The house probably was built by Henry Winston Bowyer sometime in the 1830s, and has been occupied by influential Botetourt families since that time. It occupies a commanding site on a hilloverlooking the historic courthouse community of Fincastle.

“The tract on which Santillane stands was purchased by Colonel George Hancock in 1795. Although tradition states that Colonel Hancock built a house on this property before 1800, architectural evidence indicates the present house is not the house built by Hancock. The present Greek Revival dwelling dates from the 1830s, but the kitchen wing may date from the time of the earlier house. Colonel Hancock was a delegate to the Virginia General Assembly in 1784-87, and 1792. He also served in the United States Congress at Philadelphia from 1793 to 1797. A letter written by Mrs. Hancock in 1805 records the name of the property as Santillane. Lewis and Clark visited here prior to their famous expedition, and were in Fincastle again in 1807. In 1808 William Clark married Hancock’s daughter Judith.

The Santillane estate passed to Colonel Henry Bowyer, an officer in Washington’s Army, and clerk of the Court for 43 years, early in the nineteenth century. His son Henry Winston Bowyer inherited the property in 1831, and the Bowyer family retained the house until 1876.” (Submitted on June 8, 2015.) 
Categories. ExplorationNotable Places
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by J. J. Prats of Springfield, Virginia. This page has been viewed 168 times since then and 50 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on , by J. J. Prats of Springfield, Virginia. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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