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MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Chattanooga in Hamilton County, Tennessee — The American South (East South Central)
 

1864 Military Bridge

 
 
1864 Military Bridge Marker image. Click for full size.
By Dale K. Benington, August 6, 2014
1. 1864 Military Bridge Marker
Inscription.
The first bridge crossing of the Tennessee River at Chattanooga was erected in 1864 under the order of Montgomery Meigs, Quartermaster General of the Union armies. This clearing highlights the alignment where the wooden bridge, with its trestled northern approach, crossed the southern portions of Renaissance Park.

The bridge was constructed out of green timber, cut and sawed from trees from the hills where Hill City (North Chattanooga) now stands and the adjacent hills. Work in the river was facilitated by log rafts and pontoon floats. Bridge construction was staged from the north shore so that materials could be carried across completed portions of the span.

After the war, the military bridge was given to the city of Chattanooga, but it proved to be more of a liability than an asset. Marcus B. Long (1914) recalled that a herd of mules being driven across the span collapsed the draw span and resulted in many of the mules being killed in the fall to the river. The military bridge was swept away in the flood of April 1867.
 
Location. 35° 3.678′ N, 85° 18.591′ W. Marker is in Chattanooga, Tennessee, in Hamilton County. Marker can be reached from River Street west of Tremont Street, on the left when traveling west. Click for map.
1864 Military Bridge Marker image. Click for full size.
By Dale K. Benington, August 6, 2014
2. 1864 Military Bridge Marker
Close-up view, that is displayed on the marker, of what one would assume to be a Civil War era photograph showing what appears to be the beginnings of a wooden bridge, probably being built to cross the Tennessee River at Chattanooga.
This historic marker is located along the north side of the river, in Renaissance Park, along a park walking trail that runs north-to-south. Marker is in this post office area: Chattanooga TN 37405, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Union Block House (within shouting distance of this marker); Camp Contraband (about 400 feet away, measured in a direct line); United States Colored Troops (about 400 feet away); Occupied Chattanooga (about 500 feet away); 1838 Cherokee Removal & Trail of Tears (about 500 feet away); Trail of Tears (approx. 0.3 miles away); 1790 John Ross 1866 (approx. 0.3 miles away); Chattanooga's First Citizens (approx. 0.3 miles away). Click for a list of all markers in Chattanooga.
 
Categories. Bridges & ViaductsWar, US Civil
 
1864 Military Bridge Marker image. Click for full size.
By Dale K. Benington, August 6, 2014
3. 1864 Military Bridge Marker
Close-up view, that is displayed on the marker, of what one would assume to be a Civil War era photograph showing what appears to be a well designed wooden bridge, with what appears to be Cameron Hill on the opposite bank of the river.
1864 Military Bridge Marker image. Click for full size.
By Dale K. Benington, August 6, 2014
4. 1864 Military Bridge Marker
1864 Military Bridge Marker image. Click for full size.
By Dale K. Benington, August 6, 2014
5. 1864 Military Bridge Marker
View of the marker looking north along a park walkway.
1864 Military Bridge Marker image. Click for full size.
By Dale K. Benington, August 6, 2014
6. 1864 Military Bridge Marker
View of the marker looking south along a park walkway, with a view of the downtown Chattanooga skyline in the distant background.
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Dale K. Benington of Toledo, Ohio. This page has been viewed 270 times since then and 27 times this year. Photos:   1. submitted on , by Dale K. Benington of Toledo, Ohio.   2, 3, 4, 5, 6. submitted on , by Dale K. Benington of Toledo, Ohio. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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