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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Spotsylvania in Spotsylvania County, Virginia — The American South (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Batter Up: Spotsylvania Yellow Jackets

 
 
Batter Up: Spotsylvania Yellow Jackets Marker image. Click for full size.
By Bernard Fisher, June 21, 2015
1. Batter Up: Spotsylvania Yellow Jackets Marker
Inscription. Softball and baseball were played by Spotsylvania’s African American children, teens and young adults in back yards, on church grounds and in open fields. Some, such as Layton Fairchild, Sr. (right), grew up playing baseball and were privileged to play on an organized team in the U.S. Army during World War ll.

Adjacent to Sylvannah Baptist Church were 9.64 acres owned by the estate of Liston Lewis. On July 12, 1952, Elmore Lawson (below) purchased that acreage and constructed a baseball diamond. Lawson was a farmer, carpenter, and construction contractor who also owned and operated a sawmill. He was born January 26, 1882, to Isaac and Julia Weathers Lawson, and was father of 17 all with first wife, Cora Stannard Lawson who died in 1938.

Young men who as children played baseball in their spare time and/or on the team for the John J. Wright School now used this newly constructed diamond as their home field. They called themselves the Spotsylvania Yellow Jackets and used their own finances to purchases equipment and uniforms. Teams throughout the Commonwealth came to play them, and they often travelled and returned victorious. Saturdays and after church on Sundays, the bleachers were filled with cheering fans as they watched young men such as Roy and Roger Lewis, Alfred Coleman, Rudolph Williams, the
Batter Up: Spotsylvania Yellow Jackets Marker image. Click for full size.
By Bernard Fisher, June 21, 2015
2. Batter Up: Spotsylvania Yellow Jackets Marker
Fairchild brothers Alfred Jr., Aaron and Layton, and others display skills that perhaps in another time would have brought them fame and fortune in a professional league.

The African American Heritage Trail is supported in part by a Preserve America grant administered by the National Park Service, United States Department of the Interior. This product is based upon work assisted by a grant from the U.S. Department of the Interior, National Park Service. Any opinions, findings, conclusions or recommendations expressed in this material are those of the author and do not necessarily reflect the views of the U.S. Department of the Interior.
 
Erected 2015 by Spotsylvania African American Heritage Trail.
 
Location. 38° 11.462′ N, 77° 35.201′ W. Marker is in Spotsylvania, Virginia, in Spotsylvania County. Marker is at the intersection of Courthouse Road (Virginia Route 208) and Marshall Park Lane, on the right when traveling north on Courthouse Road. Click for map. Located at the west end of the parking lot in Marshall Park. Marker is at or near this postal address: 8525 Courthouse Rd, Spotsylvania VA 22551, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Zion Methodist Church (approx. 0.2 miles away); Education in Spotsylvania County
Marshall Park image. Click for full size.
By Bernard Fisher, June 21, 2015
3. Marshall Park
(approx. 0.3 miles away); Stubbs School (approx. 0.3 miles away); The Good Hope Colored School (approx. 0.3 miles away); Forever young, (approx. 0.3 miles away); Booth Hall (approx. 0.6 miles away); Spotsylvania County Jail (approx. 0.7 miles away); Spotsylvania Courthouse and Jail (approx. 0.7 miles away). Click for a list of all markers in Spotsylvania.
 
Also see . . .  Spotsylvania African American Heritage Trail. (Submitted on June 22, 2015.)
 
Categories. African AmericansSports
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Bernard Fisher of Mechanicsville, Virginia. This page has been viewed 167 times since then. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on , by Bernard Fisher of Mechanicsville, Virginia. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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