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Appomattox in Appomattox County, Virginia — The American South (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Confederate Artillery Position

Battle of Appomattox Station

 
 
Confederate Artillery Position Marker image. Click for full size.
By Bernard Fisher, June 26, 2015
1. Confederate Artillery Position Marker
Inscription. Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee’s Army of Norther Virginia began the retreat west from Richmond and Petersburg on April 3, 1865, with about 250 cannon. Two days later, at Amelia Court House, about a hundred of the least effective pieces were culled from the army and placed under Gen. Reuben L. Walker, who was directed to march north of the main army and west toward Lynchburg. Lee hoped to reach North Carolina to combine his army with that of Confederate Gen. Joseph E. Johnston.

Both Walker’s column and Lee’s army were not far apart late on the afternoon of April 8. Walker’s artillerymen had stopped along the road here to Appomattox Station for a respite and were cooking rations when Union Gen. George A. Custer’s troopers attacked at about 4 P.M. One part of Walker’s command escaped to Lynchburg with 21 cannon and another with 54 artillery pieces to Oakville (five miles north). Walker put up a stout defense with about 30 cannon before his position was overrun. At about 8 P.M., Custer launched a final assault with all of his brigades and captured the remaining cannon. The French Creole gunners of the Donaldsonville (Louisiana) Artillery muttered, “Tout perdu” (“All is lost”). Confederate artillery Capt. William G. McCabe wrote, “Enemy attacked us in park. … Disgraceful panic. … Saw a captain
Lee's Retreat image. Click for full size.
June 26, 2015
2. Lee's Retreat
of art’y behind a stump on his knees.” One hundred cannon were effectively eliminated from Lee’s army.

”Our men stood off the enemy until dusk, repelling numerous attacks, until the greater part of the guns and wagons had moved off towards Lynchburg, when nearly the whole of Custer’s division having arrived, they made a charge and swept over all that was left.”—Capt. William W. Chamberlaine, of Walker’s staff

(captions)
(top left) Gen. Reuben L. Walker Courtesy Valentine Richmond History Center
(top center) Gen. George A. Custer Courtesy Library of Congress
(bottom right) William G. McCabe, from Armistead C. Gordon, Memories and Memorials of William Gordon McCabe (1925)
(top right) William W. Chaberlaine, from his Memoirs of the Civil War (12912)
 
Erected by Virginia Civil War Trails.
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the Virginia Civil War Trails marker series.
 
Location. 37° 21.915′ N, 78° 49.592′ W. Marker is in Appomattox, Virginia, in Appomattox County. Marker can be reached from the intersection of Jamerson Lane (Virginia Route 1014) and Jones Street (Route 1012). Click for map. Marker is in this post office area: Appomattox VA 24522, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers.
Battle of Appomattox Station CWT Markers image. Click for full size.
By Bernard Fisher, June 26, 2015
3. Battle of Appomattox Station CWT Markers
At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Walker's Last Stand (here, next to this marker); Custer's Third Brigade (within shouting distance of this marker); Winonah Camp / Mozella Price Home (approx. 0.4 miles away); Carver-Price School (approx. 0.4 miles away); Appomattox County Units (approx. 0.7 miles away); Appomattox County Eternal Flame (approx. 0.7 miles away); Appomattox Court House (approx. 0.7 miles away); The Last Positions (approx. 0.7 miles away). Click for a list of all markers in Appomattox.
 
Also see . . .  Appomattox Court House National Historical Park. (Submitted on June 27, 2015.)
 
Categories. War, US Civil
 
Battle of Appomattox Station Confederate Position image. Click for full size.
By Bernard Fisher, June 26, 2015
4. Battle of Appomattox Station Confederate Position
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Bernard Fisher of Mechanicsville, Virginia. This page has been viewed 285 times since then and 5 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4. submitted on , by Bernard Fisher of Mechanicsville, Virginia. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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