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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Near Krinides in Kavala Regional Unit, Eastern Macedonia and Thrace Region, Greece
 

The Octagon at Philippi

 
 
The Octagon at Philippi Marker image. Click for full size.
By Dale K. Benington, June 16, 2015
1. The Octagon at Philippi Marker
Inscription. English Text

In the first insula east of the Roman Forum at Philippi. between the eastward extensions of Egnatia and Emporiki streets, is the metropolitan church of Philippi, the famous Octagon, which is dedicated to the Apostle Paul. Secondary cross roads, the parodoi, ensured communication between the two large streets and demarcated the individual buildings that surrounded it.

The Octagon is a characteristic example of building a Christian church on the site of an ancient sanctuary, and a rare example of a complete Early Christian building complex. The first house of worship, a single-naved basilica, was built after the persecutions and shares a common wall with an underground Macedonian tomb and above-ground 2nd century BC heroon of Euephenes, son of Exekestos, an initiate of the Kabeirian mysteries. The founding inscription by the Bishop of Philippi, Porphyrios, on the mosaic floor of the house of prayer, decorated with symbolic scenes of birds, trees, and geometric motifs, informs us that the church was dedicated to the Apostle Paul, and founded in 313-343 AD. At the end of the 4th century, the basilica of Paul was replaced by the octagonal church, which incorporated the earlier mosaic of the basilica into its flooring, decorated with rich marble inlays. This church was preserved
The Octagon at Philippi Marker image. Click for full size.
By Dale K. Benington, June 16, 2015
2. The Octagon at Philippi Marker
Close-up view, that is displayed on the marker, of an illustration, showing how the floor plan of the Octagon structure appeared.
with various alterations, until the early 7th century.

The Octagon, which was square on its exterior and octagonal on its interior with the help of its corner conches, had on the east the protruding apse of the sanctuary with its built synthronon and the base of the Altar Table. The interior colonnade atop an eight-sided stylobate supported the galleries and dome. The church had two ambones and a narthex with marble inlaid floor. A stoa surrounded the south side of the square and continued on the east in the form of a ring around the conch. A three-aisled stoa with monumental gate on the Via Egnatia replaced the Roman side street and ensured access to the church's narthex.

West of the narthex of the Octagon and the three-aisled stoa extends a monumental atrium with a fountain building on its west side and rooms that probably belonged to a guest house for pilgrims.
 
Location. 41° 0.7′ N, 24° 17.051′ E. Marker is near Krinides, Eastern Macedonia and Thrace Region, in Kavala Regional Unit. Marker can be reached from Agiou Christoforou west of Filippou, on the right when traveling west. Click for map. This marker is located in the archaeological park, on the other side of the modern day roadway that cuts through the park, in the area of the park east of where
The Octagon at Philippi Marker image. Click for full size.
By Dale K. Benington, June 16, 2015
3. The Octagon at Philippi Marker
Close-up view, that is displayed on the marker, of an illustration, featuring where the Hellenistic tomb of a hero appeared, on the floor plan of the Octagon structure.
the Roman forum is located. Marker is in this post office area: Krinides, Eastern Macedonia and Thrace Region 640 03, Greece.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 14 kilometers of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Annexes to Octagon at Philippi (within shouting distance of this marker); Christian Philippi (within shouting distance of this marker); Basilica (about 120 meters away, measured in a direct line); Ancient Theater (approx. 0.3 kilometers away); Philippi (approx. 0.3 kilometers away); Archeological Area Filippi (approx. 0.4 kilometers away); Black Sea - Silk Road (approx. 11.5 kilometers away); Neapolis-Christoupolis-Kavala (7th C.BC. - 20th C.AD.) (approx. 13.7 kilometers away). Click for a list of all markers in Krinides.
 
Categories. Churches, Etc.
 
The Octagon at Philippi image. Click for full size.
By Dale K. Benington, June 16, 2015
4. The Octagon at Philippi
The metal railing in the picture I believe is there to protect the site of the Hellenistic tomb of a hero, that was originally incorporated into the structure of the Octagon.
The Octagon at Philippi Marker image. Click for full size.
By Dale K. Benington, June 16, 2015
5. The Octagon at Philippi Marker
Close-up view, that is displayed on the marker, of a photograph, showing the mosaic founder's inscription, made in the mosaic floor embroidery of the Octagon.
The Octagon at Philippi Marker image. Click for full size.
By Dale K. Benington, June 16, 2015
6. The Octagon at Philippi Marker
View of a passage in the, in the ruins of the Octagon complex, that leads to both the marker (seen just beneath the tree at the far end of the walkway) and an entrance to the Octagon.
The Octagon at Philippi Marker image. Click for full size.
By Dale K. Benington, June 16, 2015
7. The Octagon at Philippi Marker
View of the marker (at the end of the passage), in the ruins of the Octagon complex, at an entrance to the Octagon.
The Octagon at Philippi Marker image. Click for full size.
By Dale K. Benington, June 16, 2015
8. The Octagon at Philippi Marker
View of the marker in the foreground, and looking through the complex entrance passage and over the ruins, in the background one can see the ruins of the Octagon.
The Octagon at Philippi Marker image. Click for full size.
By Dale K. Benington, June 16, 2015
9. The Octagon at Philippi Marker
View of the Octagon ruins.
The Octagon at Philippi image. Click for full size.
By Dale K. Benington, June 16, 2015
10. The Octagon at Philippi
View of the mosaic floor that is in the Octagon, with what I believe is a view of the metal railing structure protecting the Hellenistic tomb that the Octagon incorporated into its structure when it was originally built.
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Dale K. Benington of Toledo, Ohio. This page has been viewed 246 times since then and 23 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10. submitted on , by Dale K. Benington of Toledo, Ohio. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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