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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Vancouver in Clark County, Washington — The American West (Northwest)
 

The Grant House

 

—Officers Row —

 
The Grant House Marker image. Click for full size.
By Kevin W., June 13, 2008
1. The Grant House Marker
Inscription. When the U.S. Army arrived at Fort Vancouver in May of 1849, they quickly built nine log cabins for shelter against the upcoming winter. Shown here is the 1850 plan of the two-story post commander’s quarters. It is the only remaining structure built during the initial years of Army occupation at Fort Vancouver.

Called the Grant House, it was never the residence of its namesake, though Ulysses S. Grant did serve as a quartermaster at Fort Vancouver from 1852 to 1853. It was the residence of several significant commanders, including John S. Hathaway, William W. Loring, Philip Kearney, B.L.E. Bonneville, Gabriel J. Rains, and George Wright.

In a letter written to his wife in January of 1853, Ulysses, S. Grant describes the structures on Officers Row as: “…what are called temporary buildings…having been put up in great haste with round and green logs, floors of rough green plank. They are very cold at present but they will be made comfortable next summer.”

The following year, Lieutenant Colonel B.L.E. Bonneville commented that the post commander’s quarters still required improvement: ”The quarters occupied by the Comdg Officer… should be papered inside in order to render them comfortable in the winter.” The quarters remained uncomfortable until the early 1860s when the log walls
The Grant House and Marker image. Click for full size.
By Kevin W., June 13, 2008
2. The Grant House and Marker
were covered in clapboard and the interior was adequately sealed.
 
Erected by Vancouver National Historic Reserve.
 
Location. 45° 37.677′ N, 122° 39.601′ W. Marker is in Vancouver, Washington, in Clark County. Marker is on E. Evergreen Boulevard, on the left when traveling east. Click for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 1101 E. Evergreen Blvd., Vancouver WA 98661, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Officers Row (a few steps from this marker); Vancouver Barracks Parade Ground (within shouting distance of this marker); The Marshall House (about 700 feet away, measured in a direct line); a different marker also named Officers Row (about 800 feet away); Cannon Replica Project (approx. 0.2 miles away); Congressional Medal of Honor Monument (approx. 0.2 miles away); First Japanese on the North American Continent (approx. 0.2 miles away); The O. O. Howard House (approx. 0.2 miles away). Click for a list of all markers in Vancouver.
 
Categories. Forts, CastlesNotable BuildingsNotable Persons
 
Ulysses S. Grant ca. 1865 (from the marker) image. Click for full size.
By Kevin W., June 13, 2008
3. Ulysses S. Grant ca. 1865 (from the marker)
U.S. Signal Corps photo no. III-B-2363, National Archives and Records Administration.
Drawing of the Grant House (from the marker) image. Click for full size.
By Kevin W., June 13, 2008
4. Drawing of the Grant House (from the marker)
Since the 1880s, the Grant House has been an Officers’ Club, a library, bachelor officers’ quarters, a restaurant, and a museum. The original walls are currently on view in the downstairs hallway and at the back of the building. Plan by G.C. Bomford, 1850. National Archives and Records Administration.
The Grant House image. Click for full size.
By Kevin W., June 13, 2008
5. The Grant House
Vancouver Historic Register image. Click for full size.
By Kevin W., June 13, 2008
6. Vancouver Historic Register
Originally built of logs, this was the Commander's Quarters, Vancouver Barracks 1850-1886. Brevet Captain Ulysses S. Grant, regimental quartermaster, often used the headquarters. Its log construction was later covered creating present architectural style. Listed on the National Register of Historic Places.
The Grant House image. Click for full size.
By Kevin W., June 13, 2008
7. The Grant House
The Grant House is now used as a club and restaurant.
Ground Marker on Officers Row image. Click for full size.
By Kevin W., June 13, 2008
8. Ground Marker on Officers Row
Ulysses S. Grant House 1850
During Lt. Grant's stay at Vancouver, Col Benjamin Louis Eulalie de Bonneville was in command. Bonneville was a famous explorer, immortalized in Washington Irving's tales. Grant served as Quartermaster and did not live in this house. In 1879 Grant returned as the victoriouse general of the Civil War and retired President of the United States. It was during this visit that appreciative citizens named the house, then an officer's club, for him.
Donated by Northwest Natural Gas Company
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Kevin W. of Stafford, Virginia. This page has been viewed 1,625 times since then and 17 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5. submitted on , by Kevin W. of Stafford, Virginia.   6, 7. submitted on , by Kevin W. of Stafford, Virginia.   8. submitted on , by Kevin W. of Stafford, Virginia. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
 
Editor’s want-list for this marker. Pictures of the original walls viewable from inside the Grant House. • Can you help?
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