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Landrum in Greenville County, South Carolina — The American South (South Atlantic)
Campbell’s Covered Bridge
 
Campbell's Covered Bridge Marker Photo, Click for full size
By Brian Scott, February 18, 2004
1. Campbell's Covered Bridge Marker
 
Inscription.
This bridge, built in 1909, is the last extant covered bridge in S.C. Built by Charles Irwin Willis (1878–1966), it was named for Alexander Lafayette Campbell (1836–1920), who owned and operated a grist mill here for many years. Measuring 35 feet long and 12 feet wide, it is an excellent example of a four-span Howe truss, featuring diagonal timbers and vertical iron rods.
 
Erected 2002 by Cherokee Foothills National Scenic Byway Association. (Marker Number 23-25.)
 
Location. 35° 5.159′ N, 82° 15.845′ W. Marker is in Landrum, South Carolina, in Greenville County. Marker is on Campbell Covered Bridge Road. Click for map. Marker is in this post office area: Landrum SC 29356, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 10 other markers are within 6 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. A different marker also named Campbell's Covered Bridge (a few steps from this marker); a different marker also named Campbell's Covered Bridge (within shouting distance of this marker); Cherokee Foothills (approx. 3.4 miles away); Manufacturing Site (approx. 4.2 miles away but has been reported missing); William Few Bridge (approx. 5 miles away); To the Glory of God (approx. 5.1 miles away); David Barton Home Site (approx. 5.7 miles away); O'Neal Village (approx. 5.7 miles away); Holly Springs (approx. 5.9 miles away); Holly Springs Rock Wall (approx. 5.9 miles away). Click for a list of all markers in Landrum.
 
Campbell's Covered Bridge Marker Photo, Click for full size
By Stanley and Terrie Howard, April 26, 2009
2. Campbell's Covered Bridge Marker
 

 
Also see . . .
1. Campbell's Covered Bridge. Campbell’s Covered Bridge, built in 1909, is significant for its role in transportation in early twentieth century Greenville County and as an excellent intact example of a Howe truss covered bridge, the only surviving covered bridge in the state. (Submitted on July 23, 2009, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 

2. Campbell's Covered Bridge. Campbell's Covered Bridge is a covered bridge in South Carolina, located in northeastern Greenville County near the small town of Gowensville. (Submitted on July 23, 2009, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 

3. Howe truss. The relatively rare Howe truss, patented in 1840 by Massachusetts millwright William Howe, includes vertical members and diagonals that slope up towards the center, the opposite of the Pratt truss. (Submitted on July 23, 2009, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 

4. Greenville County Recreation District: Campbell Covered Bridge. Constructed in 1909 Campbell’s Covered Bridge is the only remaining covered bridge in the State of South Carolina. (Submitted on August 16, 2009, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 
 
Additional comments.
1. Campbell's Covered Bridge
Campbell’s Covered Bridge, built in 1909, is located in rural north Greenville County, South Carolina, near Gowansville, and crosses
 
Campbell’s Covered Bridge and Marker Photo, Click for full size
By Brian Scott, August 15, 2009
3. Campbell’s Covered Bridge and Marker
Work continues on the creation of the Campbell Covered Bridge Park, including cleaning up the brush that has grown around the bridge.
 
Beaver Dam Creek on Campbell Bridge Road. This wooden bridge with a metal roof is 35’ long by 12’ wide.

It sits on a rock foundation with a concrete cap, as masons supplemented existing rock formations on each side of Beaver Dam Creek as load-bearing abutments and partial foundations. Concrete was poured atop the rock formations, and 12” x 12” heart-of-pine sills were mounted on the concrete cap with 4.5’ iron rods. Once the two trusses were in final position, they were braced or tied in place for the remaining construction of the bridge decking, sides and roof. Buttresses were then built at each end of the bridge and at the center point of each truss. They rested on the main timbers carrying the floor load and extended three feet past the sides of the bridge to provide stability along the weak axis of the truss.

Campbell’s Covered Bridge is a four-span Howe truss bridge with counter braces. The two outer spans are 9’ long and the two inner spans are 8’ long. Each truss is 4” x 8”, and each counter brace is made from 2’ x 8’ pine boards nailed together in an interlocking pattern. Vertical tie rods calling kingposts, made from 1” diameter iron rods, are in between each span, tying the top and bottom chords together. This method of truss construction absorbs and transfers a passing vehicle’s weight to the rock abutments on each end of
 
Campbell's Covered Bridge Marker Photo, Click for full size
By Stanley and Terrie Howard, April 26, 2009
4. Campbell's Covered Bridge Marker
Campbell’s Bridge, constructed in 1909, restored in 1964 with the cooperation of the Crescent Community Club. Restored in 1990.
 
the bridge.

The builder, Charles Irwin Willis (1878-1966), allowed the truss ends to follow the natural lay of the land and built the rest of the bridge to fit; as a result – and according to Willis’s design – the bridge is neither square nor plumb.

The siding of the bridge consists of 1” x 6” pine boards with 1’ battens covering the joints. Siding covers the three wooden buttresses that jut out on each side of the deck, forming a triangular shape and sheathed with cedar shakes. A gable roof of five-V galvanized steel covers the structure. The bridge is open at both ends, with a gap at the top between the siding and roof to allow for air circulation. The deck is made from 2” x 6” pine boards. The trusses are exposed on the interior of the bridge.

In 1951, Pleasant Hill Road was rerouted, and the historic roadbed was renamed Campbell Covered Bridge Road. It remained a gravel-over-clay road until it was resurfaced by tar and gravel in 1987. In 1964, the bridge siding, deck, and roof were repaired and the bridge was painted, most likely for the first time. Local traffic continued to use the bridge, but most traffic used the rerouted Pleasant Hill Road instead. In 1984, Greenville County closed the bridge to all vehicular traffic.

Retaining walls were built and the dirt was dumped up against each end of the bridge,
 
Campbell's Covered Bridge Photo, Click for full size
By Brian Scott, July 1, 2003
5. Campbell's Covered Bridge
 
in effect creating two dead end roads. By 1990, the bridge needed renovation once more; worn or rotten boards were replaced with fresh rough-cut pine boards and the tin roof was replaced with a galvanized steel roof.

Since the bridge was weighed between 85,000 and 100,000 pounds, a 50-ton jack was used to life the bridge off the foundation to replace the large sills at each end with new sills of pressure treated lumber. Cracks between the pressure-treated pieces allow air to circulate, preventing any buildup of moisture in the future. The bridge was repainted at that time as well.

Campbell’s Covered Bridge, built in 1909, is eligible for listing in the National Register of Historic Places under Criterion A for its role in transportation in early twentieth century Greenville County and the “Dark Corner” region of northwestern South Carolina, and under Criterion C as an excellent intact example of a Howe truss covered bridge and the only surviving covered bridge in the state.

Additional Information
This bridge was one of four covered bridges in this part of northern Greenville County in the first decade of the twentieth century; before this time, the only safe crossing over Beaver Dam Creek was a narrow rock shoal. Morrow’s Covered Bridge and McClain’s Covered Bridge spanning the Middle Tyger River on Pleasant Hill Road and S.C. Highway
 
Campbell’s Covered Bridge Photo, Click for full size
By Stanley and Terrie Howard, April 12, 2011
6. Campbell’s Covered Bridge
 
14, respectively, and a third unnamed covered bridge spanned the South Tyger River between S.C. Highways 101 and 253. Campbell’s Covered Bridge was the largest and most sophisticated of the four.

The construction of this bridge connected several rural communities and small towns in the immediate vicinity, so that a 25-mile trip which had once taken a full day before the bridge was completed could be made in about an hour afterwards.

Charles Irwin Willis (1878-1966), an accomplished local builder in the northern part of Greenville County, built the bridge. Long and large timbers required for the bridge exceeded the capability of most sawmills, and had to be sawed by a nearby sawmill owned and operated by James M. Suddeth. When completed, the bridge was named for Alexander Lafayette Campbell (1836-1920), local landowner and millwright who lived at the site and operated a corn grist mill about 50 feet downstream from the bridge.

William Howe, of Spencer, Massachusetts, patented his new wood and iron rod truss design in 1840, and then extended the patent with improvements in 1850. His truss was the first to be designed using mathematical stress analysis. The truss consists of wooden upper and lower chords, which are linked together with sets of dual iron rods and wooden braces and counter braces. The braces and counter braces are butted against the chords
 
Campbell’s Covered Bridge Photo, Click for full size
By Brian Scott, June 24, 2008
7. Campbell’s Covered Bridge
 
on angle blocks. The iron rods are adjusted with large nuts.

The Howe truss design is the reverse of the more common Pratt truss design. In the Pratt design, diagonal members all slant toward the closest bridge end, so they are subject to compressive forces. This design requires large steel members, making it an uneconomical choice in many instances. The Howe truss, originally designed to combine timber compression members and vertical iron rod tension members, was more efficient than the Pratt truss for building longer bridge spans carrying heavy loads. It was adopted by the railroad industry and eventually became one of the most widely used trusses for steel railroad bridges.

Plans are underway for Campbell’s Covered Bridge, the last extant covered bridge in South Carolina, to become the focal point of a new 15-acre passive park planned by the Greenville County Recreational District. (Source: National Register nomination form.)
    — Submitted July 23, 2009, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.

2. Historic covered bridge gets TLC
The Greenville News
By Anna Lee, Staff writer
July 4, 2009

Walking beneath its steep arched roof, timbers crisscrossing overhead, it's possible to see a century's worth of declarations of love — the bold initials
 
Campbell's Covered Bridge Photo, Click for full size
By Stanley and Terrie Howard, April 26, 2009
8. Campbell's Covered Bridge
 
and crooked hearts that are carved into the wood beams of Campbell's Covered Bridge in northern Greenville County.

Located off State 414, the span is the last remaining covered bridge in South Carolina. The Greenville County Recreation District is taking note of the bridge's age and rarity by restoring its roof and creating a park with a $94,000 project that's expected to be complete by mid-October.

Paul Ellis, recreation planning director, said the site will have historical markers, a parking lot and picnic tables overlooking Beaverdam Creek.

The bridge will be anchored by two meadows, one next to the road and the other on a hillside, Ellis said.

He added that while the bridge is in good shape because of upkeep and renovations over the past 40 years, its roof has rusty panels that need to be restored.

Measuring 35 feet long and 12 feet wide, Campbell's Covered Bridge was built in 1909 after a torrential summer rainstorm the previous year washed out nearly every bridge in Greenville County, Ellis said. A roof was added to the bridge to protect the wood floor from water damage.

Once complete, the bridge will be a “piece of the historical site pie that by itself is maybe not that significant, but when you add it to other sites like Poinsett Bridge and Hagood House, you end up with a nice little collection of history in northern
 
Campbell’s Covered Bridge Photo, Click for full size
By Brian Scott, August 15, 2009
9. Campbell’s Covered Bridge
 
Greenville County,” Ellis said.

As work progresses on the bridge, the recreation district will begin breaking ground at the Pelham Mill site off State 14 in Greer, where the first textile mill in Greenville County was built in 1820.

Centered on a stonework dam built in the 19th century, the park will feature walking trails, overlooks of the Enoree River and a 3.5-acre dog park near the entrance of the site, where a large grassy knoll that's shaded by several large oak trees now stands.

The recreation district will work in partnership with Renewable Water Resources (formerly Western Carolina Sewer Authority) and the Greenville County Historic Preservation Commission to finish the estimated $200,000 project by its fall opening date, Ellis said.

Greenville County Council recently allotted $100,000 in hospitality tax money for the project, $12,000 of which has been spent to restore the 11 windows of the mill office building, which served as the Pelham post office from the 1930s until 1996.

The 990-square-foot structure will have a new roof installed, and the interior will be modernized to be used for private rentals and meetings, said Rick Owens, a member of the Historic Preservation Commission.

Dan Powell, coordinator of Keep Greenville County Beautiful, said the project could soon receive a $10,000 beautification grant from
 
Campbell's Covered Bridge Photo, Click for full size
By Stanley and Terrie Howard, April 26, 2009
10. Campbell's Covered Bridge
 
Keep America Beautiful.

The money would be used to plant trees and native plants at the site, Powell said.
    — Submitted July 23, 2009, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.
 
Campbell’s Covered Bridge Interior Wall and Brace -<br>Note the Carved Names Photo, Click for full size
By Brian Scott, August 15, 2009
11. Campbell’s Covered Bridge Interior Wall and Brace -
Note the Carved Names
 
 
Campbell’s Covered Bridge Interior Roof Photo, Click for full size
By Brian Scott, August 15, 2009
12. Campbell’s Covered Bridge Interior Roof
 
 
Steps Leading to the Campbell Mill Ruins Photo, Click for full size
By Brian Scott, June 24, 2008
13. Steps Leading to the Campbell Mill Ruins
 
 
Campbell Well Photo, Click for full size
By Brian Scott, August 15, 2009
14. Campbell Well
 
 
Fieldstone Wall Leading to Mill Ruins Photo, Click for full size
By Brian Scott, June 24, 2008
15. Fieldstone Wall Leading to Mill Ruins
 
 
Mill Ruins - From Bridge's North Entrance Photo, Click for full size
By Brian Scott, August 15, 2009
16. Mill Ruins - From Bridge's North Entrance
The foundation of the mill are finally visible, after being covered by acres of kudzu for decades.
 
 
Alexander Lafayette Campbell (1836–1920) Tombstone Photo, Click for full size
By Brian Scott, August 15, 2009
17. Alexander Lafayette Campbell (1836–1920) Tombstone
 
 
Alexander Lafayette Campbell (1836–1920) Tombstone Photo, Click for full size
By Brian Scott, August 15, 2009
18. Alexander Lafayette Campbell (1836–1920) Tombstone
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on April 18, 2008, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina. This page has been viewed 1,907 times since then. Last updated on June 23, 2008, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina. Photos:   1. submitted on April 18, 2008, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.   2. submitted on April 26, 2009, by Stanley and Terrie Howard of Greer, South Carolina.   3. submitted on August 16, 2009, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.   4. submitted on April 26, 2009, by Stanley and Terrie Howard of Greer, South Carolina.   5. submitted on April 18, 2008, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.   6. submitted on May 9, 2011, by Stanley and Terrie Howard of Greer, South Carolina.   7. submitted on July 23, 2009, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.   8. submitted on April 26, 2009, by Stanley and Terrie Howard of Greer, South Carolina.   9. submitted on August 16, 2009, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.   10. submitted on April 26, 2009, by Stanley and Terrie Howard of Greer, South Carolina.   11, 12. submitted on August 16, 2009, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.   13. submitted on July 23, 2009, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.   14. submitted on August 16, 2009, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.   15. submitted on July 23, 2009, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.   16, 17, 18. submitted on August 16, 2009, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina. • Kevin W. was the editor who published this page.
 
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