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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Crane in Crane County, Texas — The American South (West South Central)
 

Juan Cordona Lake

(11 Miles Southwest)

 
 
Juan Cordona Lake Marker image. Click for full size.
By Richard Denney, April 16, 2014
1. Juan Cordona Lake Marker
Inscription. A natural salt deposit, known and used for the past 300 years. On land grant from Mexico to Juan Cordova; name, misread on maps, is now unique to lake.

Apaches were encountered here by explorers in 1683. From days of early settlers, Mexicans and Anglo-Texans relied on this salt deposit. During the civil war, 1861-1865, a 7-family San Saba wagon train traded watermelons and other goods to Indians here for sorely needed salt.

In 1912-1914 a 36-burro train hauled salt from here. Recently as 1930, commercial shipments went out to Midland and Odessa.
 
Erected 1965 by State Historical Survey Committee. (Marker Number 2871.)
 
Location. 31° 23.811′ N, 102° 21.128′ W. Marker is in Crane, Texas, in Crane County. Marker is on West 6th Street (State Highway 329) east of South Sue Street, on the right when traveling east. Click for map. Located in front of the Crane County Courthouse. Marker is at or near this postal address: 253 W 6th St, Crane TX 79731, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 5 other markers are within 14 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. William Carey Crane (a few steps from this marker); Castle Mountain (approx. 7.3 miles away
Juan Cordona Lake Panorama image. Click for full size.
By Richard Denney
2. Juan Cordona Lake Panorama
but has been reported missing); Crane County (approx. 7.4 miles away); Church and Fields Oil Discovery Well (approx. 7.4 miles away); Horse Head Crossing on the Pecos River (approx. 13.6 miles away).
 
Additional comments.
1.
A good source for history on Juan Cordona is Patrick Dearen's Castle Gap and the Pecos Frontier. Fort Worth: Texas Christian UP, 1988. Dearen states the Jumano Indians utilized a trail to access and trade salt that ran from their pueblo at La Junta de los Rios (modern day Presido-Ojinaga), crossing the Pecos at a ford that came to be known the Salt Crossing, then onto Juan Cordona.
    — Submitted April 28, 2014, by Richard Denney of Austin, Texas.

 
Categories. ExplorationHispanic AmericansIndustry & CommerceNative Americans
 
Juan Cordona Lake image. Click for full size.
By Richard Denney
3. Juan Cordona Lake
Juan Cordona Lake Marker image. Click for full size.
By Bill Kirchner, July 10, 2015
4. Juan Cordona Lake Marker
Juan Cordona Lake Marker (at right) image. Click for full size.
By Bill Kirchner, July 10, 2015
5. Juan Cordona Lake Marker (at right)
William Carey Crane marker is at the far left.
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Richard Denney of Austin, Texas. This page has been viewed 467 times since then and 40 times this year. Last updated on , by Bill Kirchner of Tucson, Arizona. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on , by Richard Denney of Austin, Texas.   4, 5. submitted on , by Bill Kirchner of Tucson, Arizona. • Andrew Ruppenstein was the editor who published this page. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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