Marker Logo HMdb.org THE HISTORICAL
MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
El Paso in El Paso County, Texas — The American South (West South Central)
 

Fort Bliss at Lanoria Mesa

 
 
Fort Bliss at Lanoria Mesa Marker image. Click for full size.
By PaulwC3, July 20, 2013
1. Fort Bliss at Lanoria Mesa Marker
Inscription. In 1849, U.S. troops led by Maj. Jefferson Van Horne established a post in what is now downtown El Paso to secure territory gained in the U.S.-Mexico War, 1846-48. It moved several times: to Magoffinsville in 1854; to Camp Concordia in 1868; back downtown in 1878; to Hart’s Mill in the 1880s; and finally to Lanoria Mesa in 1893 on land donated by El Paso citizens. The post name changed in 1854 to honor Lt. Col. William Wallace Smith Bliss, a veteran of the U.S.-Mexico War.

In 1911, responding to revolution in Mexico, the government reinforced the infantry with artillery and cavalry units. In 1916, the U.S. began large-scale military operations into northern Mexico after revolutionaries attacked Columbus, New Mexico. The Punitive Expedition, led by Gen. John J. Pershing in pursuit of Francisco “Pancho” Villa, used Fort Bliss as headquarters. It utilized more than 100,000 U.S. troops, providing vital field training for soldiers and commanders who would soon be involved in what was World War I.

By 1941, Fort Bliss was the nation’s largest cavalry post. With the onset of World War II, the government increased the size of the post to more than a million acres, spanning this part of Texas and a large portion of the Tularosa Basin in New Mexico. Eighty battalions of anti-aircraft artillerymen trained at Fort Bliss as
Wide view of the Fort Bliss at Lanoria Mesa Marker image. Click for full size.
By PaulwC3, July 20, 2013
2. Wide view of the Fort Bliss at Lanoria Mesa Marker
part of the war effort. After the war, German scientists brought to the fort began the U.S. Army’s missile program.

Fort Bliss has deployed troops to all parts of the world in defense of the U.S., and it has been a training center for both U.S. and allied troops. The fort’s climate, size and rich history have combined to make it a key strategic asset for the nation.
 
Erected 2005 by Texas Historical Commission. (Marker Number 13729.)
 
Location. 31° 47.734′ N, 106° 24.349′ W. Marker is in El Paso, Texas, in El Paso County. Marker is on Robert E. Lee Road 0.1 miles west of Airport Road, on the right when traveling west. Click for map. The marker is located at the Robert E. Lee gate to Fort Bliss. It is accessible from a vehicle pull-off at the gate. Marker is at or near this postal address: Building 5472, Robert E. Lee Road, Fort Bliss TX 79916, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 2 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Buffalo Soldier Memorial of El Paso (approx. 0.4 miles away); An Almost Forgotten History (approx. 0.4 miles away); Fort Bliss, C.S.A. (approx. 1.3 miles away); Wilson Park (approx. 1.7 miles away);
Fort Bliss at Lanoria Mesa Marker image. Click for full size.
By Bill Kirchner, July 10, 2015
3. Fort Bliss at Lanoria Mesa Marker
Depression Era Group: 1927 - 1939 (approx. 1.7 miles away); Hammett House (approx. 1.8 miles away); The Howze House (approx. 1.8 miles away); Pershing Circle (approx. 1.8 miles away).
 
More about this marker. Public access to Fort Bliss changes, but as of 9/1/2013 the regulations are: "Civilians are welcome on Post and may enter Fort Bliss by showing a U.S. Driver's License or U.S. Government Issued ID at the Robert E. Lee Gate (by El Paso International Airport) or Cassidy Gate (off HWY 54) seven days a week, 24-hours a day."
 
Related markers. Click here for a list of markers that are related to this marker. To better understand the relationship, study each marker in the order shown.
 
Also see . . .  Fort Bliss | The Handbook of Texas Online| Texas State Historical Association (TSHA). (Submitted on September 1, 2013, by PaulwC3 of Northern, Virginia.)
 
Categories. Forts, CastlesWar, Mexican-American
 
Fort Bliss in the 20th Century image. Click for full size.
By PaulwC3, July 20, 2013
4. Fort Bliss in the 20th Century
The weapons of Fort Bliss of the 20th Century on display at the Fort Bliss and Old Ironsides Museum. They range from artillery and tanks to early rocketry.
Lt. Col. William Wallace Smith Bliss monument image. Click for full size.
By PaulwC3, July 20, 2013
5. Lt. Col. William Wallace Smith Bliss monument
The original grave marker of Fort Bliss's namesake. Originally buried in New Orleans, he was reburied at the Fort Bliss National Cemetery in 1955. The monument was moved from the Girard Street Cemetery to the main post's parade ground.
Fort Bliss Replica Museum (1948) image. Click for full size.
By PaulwC3, July 20, 2013
6. Fort Bliss Replica Museum (1948)
Built to commemorate one hundred years of U.S. military presence in El Paso, it recreates the buildings and living conditions of Fort Bliss at Magoffinsville (1853-1868).
Fort Bliss Replica Museum (1948) image. Click for full size.
By PaulwC3, July 20, 2013
7. Fort Bliss Replica Museum (1948)
Built to commemorate one hundred years of U.S. military presence in El Paso, it recreates the buildings and living conditions of Fort Bliss at Magoffinsville (1853-1868).
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by PaulwC3 of Northern, Virginia. This page has been viewed 491 times since then and 38 times this year. Last updated on , by J. Makali Bruton of Querétaro, Mexico. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on , by PaulwC3 of Northern, Virginia.   3. submitted on , by Bill Kirchner of Tucson, Arizona.   4, 5, 6, 7. submitted on , by PaulwC3 of Northern, Virginia. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page. This page was last revised on October 2, 2016.
Paid Advertisement