Marker Logo HMdb.org THE HISTORICAL
MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Albany in Shackelford County, Texas — The American South (West South Central)
 

The Rev. John Brown, Clara Barton and the 1886-1887 Drought Relief

 
 
The Rev. John Brown, Clara Barton and the 1886-1887 Drought Relief Marker image. Click for full size.
By Duane Hall, June 27, 2015
1. The Rev. John Brown, Clara Barton and the 1886-1887 Drought Relief Marker
Inscription. Scottish immigrant John Brown (1842-1903) moved west following his theological studies in New York. He married Mary Jane Matthews Larn near Fort Griffin and in 1884 became minister of Albany Presbyterian Church, just as West Texas farmers and ranchers were struggling to survive the effects of a prolonged drought. Local leaders selected Brown to represent them in seeking funds for the purchase of seed wheat for small farmers.
     Brown departed in August 1886 to appeal to financial institutions in eastern cities. Newspaper editors publicized his quest as he traveled, and he soon drew the ire of Texas editors and land and railroad promoters who feared the publicity would harm the state’s economic development. Thanks to his efforts, however, several railroad cars of seed wheat were sent to Texas, as well as several thousand dollars collected by eastern Presbyterian churches. Believing it was as appropriate to ask for drought relief as to seek aid following hurricanes, Brown also appealed to Clara Barton and the American Red Cross.
     Brown returned home, and at the request of twenty-one counties addressed the Texas legislature. A bill passed authorizing relief funds and Gov. L.S. (Sul) Ross signed it into law. Meanwhile, the Red Cross sent clothing, household goods and tools to Albany. In January 1887, Clara Barton arrived to
The Rev. John Brown, Clara Barton<br>and the 1886-1887 Drought Relief Marker image. Click for full size.
By Duane Hall, June 27, 2015
2. The Rev. John Brown, Clara Barton
and the 1886-1887 Drought Relief Marker
Located on the west side
of the grounds of the Shackelford County Courthouse
tour Shackelford, Stephens, Young and Callahan counties. On her way home, she visited the Dallas Morning News and left a personal check for $20, encouraging the editor to solicit funds to help the drought-stricken farmers.
     In 1887, John Brown moved from Albany to Massachusetts, where he served in the state legislature. He later wrote a book entitled Twenty-Five Years a Parson in the Wild West.
 
Erected 2006 by Texas Historical Commission. (Marker Number 13676.)
 
Location. 32° 43.368′ N, 99° 17.818′ W. Marker is in Albany, Texas, in Shackelford County. Marker can be reached from the intersection of S. Main Street (U.S. 283) and S. 2nd Street, on the right when traveling north. Click for map. Marker is located on the west side of the grounds of the Shackelford County Courthouse. Marker is at or near this postal address: 225 S. Main St, Albany TX 76430, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Shackelford County (a few steps from this marker); First Producing Oil Well in West Texas (a few steps from this marker); Shackelford County Courthouse (within shouting distance of this marker); Lt. Col. William E. Dyess
Shackelford County Courthouse image. Click for full size.
By Duane Hall, June 27, 2015
3. Shackelford County Courthouse
View to the east across S. Main Street (US 283)
Marker is left (north) of the sidewalk to the main entrance of the courthouse
(within shouting distance of this marker); Texas Cattle Trail (within shouting distance of this marker); James Robert Green (within shouting distance of this marker); Rear Admiral Emory Arden Grantham (within shouting distance of this marker); Lt. Colonel William Edwin Dyess (within shouting distance of this marker). Click for a list of all markers in Albany.
 
Categories. Charity & Public WorkChurches, Etc.Disasters
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Duane Hall of Abilene, Texas. This page has been viewed 170 times since then and 8 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on , by Duane Hall of Abilene, Texas. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
Paid Advertisement