Marker Logo HMdb.org THE HISTORICAL
MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Fredericksburg, Virginia — The American South (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Stephens Family Cemetery

 

—The Battle of Fredericksburg —

 
Stephens Family Cemetery Marker image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, May 25, 2008
1. Stephens Family Cemetery Marker
Inscription. Buried here are eight members of the Innis, Mazeen, and Stephens families, including the most famous of them all: Martha Stephens.

Local children knew Martha Stephens as "Granny." They also remembered her ever-present apron, the pipe often clenched in her teeth, and her matronly form. But Martha Stephens was no typical "Granny." At the time when women rarely owned property, she owned no fewer than seven tracts, including a 92-acre farm in Spotsylvania County. For a time, she ran a saloon in her home. A local resident remembered her as "uneducated [and] too free and outspoken in what she said and did and how she did it."

When she died in 1888 at the age of 68, the local paper called her a "genial spirit" and recalled wartime efforts to aid the wounded during the Battle of Fredericksburg. "Her ministrations will never be forgotten by those who survive," the paper noted, "and companions of those who died will ever cherish her memory."
 
Erected by Fredericksburg and Spotsylvania National Military Park - National Park Service - U.S. Dept. of the Interior.
 
Location. 38° 17.731′ N, 77° 28.094′ W. Marker is in Fredericksburg, Virginia. Marker is on Sunken Road 0.1 miles north of Lafayette Boulevard (Virginia
Stephens Family Cemetery Marker image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, May 25, 2008
2. Stephens Family Cemetery Marker
Highway 1), on the right when traveling north. Click for map. Located on the Sunken Road walking trail, which starts at the Fredericksburg battlefield visitor center. The Sunken Road is closed to vehicle traffic. Marker is in this post office area: Fredericksburg VA 22401, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Innis House (here, next to this marker); The Stephens House (a few steps from this marker); Thomas R. R. Cobb (a few steps from this marker); The Confederate Line (within shouting distance of this marker); The Killing Fields (within shouting distance of this marker); Seeking Cover (within shouting distance of this marker); The Union Attacks Begin (within shouting distance of this marker); Confederates on the Ridge (within shouting distance of this marker). Click for a list of all markers in Fredericksburg.
 
Regarding Stephens Family Cemetery. In the 1930s or 40s the Park service had a metal sign at the Stephens Family Cemetery which read:
The Grave of Martha Stevens
Living on Cheerfully at the scene of her Civil War fame, Mrs. Martha Stevens, a midwife and practical nurse, became the idol of a postwar generation. Battlefield visitors were entranced by the stout and jolly white haired "Granny" Stevens, always modest in her old-fashioned
Stephens Family Cemetery image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, July 6, 2008
3. Stephens Family Cemetery
No headstones remain, only a memorial.
sunbonnet. She died on December 19, 1888 at the age of 64 and lies buried in this private graveyard.

 
Also see . . .
1. Sunken Road Tour. National Park Service page detailing the Sunken Road, including the Stephens House. (Submitted on June 26, 2008, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.) 

2. Fredericksburg Sunken Road Tour. Robert Koch's Civil War tour page showing sites along the sunken road. Note at one time the grave site was enclosed within a white fence. The text of the old NPS marker at the spot is based on his photos. (Submitted on December 25, 2008, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.) 
 
Categories. Cemeteries & Burial SitesWar, US Civil
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia. This page has been viewed 1,576 times since then and 26 times this year. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on , by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.   3. submitted on , by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
Paid Advertisement