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Fredericksburg, Virginia — The American South (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Innis House

 

—The Battle of Fredericksburg —

 
Innis House Marker image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, May 25, 2008
1. Innis House Marker
Inscription. This frame building, known as the Innis (or "Ennis") house, stands as a mute witness to the terrible combat that engulfed this spot. Located along the Confederate line of battle, the small structure was marred by soldier graffiti and perforated by bullets and shell fragments. Confederate General Lafayette McLaws wrote that the house "had no space as large as two hands on it that had not been pierced."

Although the family replaced the exterior clapboards, you can still see bullet marks on one of the vertical timbers on the right side of the house. More dramatic is the damage to the house's interior. Martha Stephens, who lived next door and probably owned this building too, chose not to replace the partition wall separating the hallway from the living room. The scars made by dozens of bullets as visible today as they were in 1862.
 
Erected by Fredericksburg and Spotsylvania National Military Park - National Park Service - U.S. Dept. of the Interior.
 
Location. 38° 17.735′ N, 77° 28.096′ W. Marker is in Fredericksburg, Virginia. Marker is on Sunken Road 0.1 miles north of Lafayette Boulevard (Virginia Highway 1), on the right when traveling north. Click for map. Located on the Sunken Road walking trail,
Marker and the Innis House image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, May 25, 2008
2. Marker and the Innis House
which starts at the Fredericksburg battlefield visitor center. The Sunken Road is closed to vehicle traffic. Marker is in this post office area: Fredericksburg VA 22401, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Stephens Family Cemetery (here, next to this marker); The Stephens House (a few steps from this marker); Thomas R. R. Cobb (within shouting distance of this marker); The Confederate Line (within shouting distance of this marker); The Killing Fields (within shouting distance of this marker); Seeking Cover (within shouting distance of this marker); The Union Attacks Begin (within shouting distance of this marker); Confederates on the Ridge (within shouting distance of this marker). Click for a list of all markers in Fredericksburg.
 
More about this marker. The lower portion of the marker is a photograph of The bullet-scarred partition wall.
 
Also see . . .  Sunken Road Tour. National Park Service page detailing the Sunken Road, including the Stephens House. (Submitted on June 26, 2008, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.) 
 
Additional comments.
1. Older National Park Service Marker
An older NPS
Innis House image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, July 6, 2008
3. Innis House
Three holes just to the right of the rightmost window are bullet holes from the battle.
marker was placed, probably in the 1930s, at the Innis House. It read:
A Civil War Landmark
This modest cottage, known as the Innis house, withstood both battles of Fredericksburg, unlike Martha Stevens, the Innis family abandoned their home before the contending armies reached their doorstep. Southern sharpshooters utilized the building as a shelter on December 13, 1862, but it was overrun in the defeat of the Confederate rear guard the next spring, the Innis house exterior retains much of its Civil War appearance.
This marker was a monopole type, about three feet high. It was dark green with white lettering.
    — Submitted December 25, 2008, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.

 
Categories. War, US Civil
 
The Innis House image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, July 6, 2008
4. The Innis House
Bullet holes inside the Innis House image. Click for full size.
By Brandon Fletcher, July 19, 2008
5. Bullet holes inside the Innis House
Bullet holes inside the Innis House image. Click for full size.
By Brandon Fletcher, July 19, 2008
6. Bullet holes inside the Innis House
Bullet holes inside the Innis House image. Click for full size.
By Brandon Fletcher, July 19, 2008
7. Bullet holes inside the Innis House
Innis House Door image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, May 25, 2008
8. Innis House Door
Preserved in the Visitor Center is the door taken from the Innis House during renovation.
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia. This page has been viewed 2,256 times since then and 5 times this year. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on , by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.   3, 4. submitted on , by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.   5, 6, 7. submitted on , by Brandon Fletcher of Chattanooga, Tennessee.   8. submitted on , by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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