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Petersburg in Dinwiddie County, Virginia — The American South (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Petersburg Battlefields

Contested Ground

 
 
Petersburg Battlefields Marker image. Click for full size.
By Shane Oliver, July 18, 2015
1. Petersburg Battlefields Marker
Inscription. From here at Fort Welch, you can see the ground over which soldiers struggled during three distinct battles. On October 2, 1864, Federals advanced across the ground to your left in an attempt to capture the key Confederate intermediate supply route, the Boydton Plank Road, on the last day of the Battle of Peebles' Farm. The attack failed, but the Federals won a foothold and established the line of works in which you stand.

"There has not been a day nor an hour that out front line has not been in actual combat with the foe. Where can the student find a parallel to this in the warfare of any age or people?"—"John," Union war correspondent

"We only get five little crackers for one day rations. We don't get no meat now but about a twist a week. If that ain't hard times I don't know what hard times is."—Pvt. Francis Marion Poteeet, 49th North Carolina Infantry, CSA

On March 25, 1865, Federals attacked and captured the Confederate picket line to your front in what is known as the Battle of Jones Farm. That success formed the prelude to the massive Union attack across the entire field in front of you a week later, when on April 2 the Federals finally broke through the Southern lines. This attack is known as the Breakthrough, and it caused the entire Confederate front to collapse.

(captions)
In
Petersburg Battlefields Marker image. Click for full size.
By Bernard Fisher, October 17, 2015
2. Petersburg Battlefields Marker
recent years the Civil War Trust and the National Park Service have worked to improve access and visibility around Fort Welch. Until 2014, the field in front of you was almost entirely wooded. – Courtesy Civil War Trust

Battle of Peebles' Farm—Union Advance
October 2, 1864

The Breakthrough
April 2, 1865

Battle of Jones Farm
March 25, 1865

Main Confederate Line
1 Mile

South Side Railroad
3 Miles

Boydton Plank Road
1.5 Miles

Main Confederate Line
1 Mile

Richmond
25 Miles

Petersburg
5 Miles
 
Erected by Virginia Civil War Trails and the Civil War Trust.
 
Location. 37° 10.369′ N, 77° 27.608′ W. Marker is in Petersburg, Virginia, in Dinwiddie County. Marker can be reached from the intersection of Church Road (Virginia Route 627) and Flank Road, on the left when traveling north. Click for map. Marker can be reached by hiking the trail located across Church Road west of Fort Fisher (Tour Stop 3 on Petersburg National Battlefield's Western Front Auto Tour). Marker is at or near this postal address: Church Road, Petersburg VA 23803, Petersburg VA 23803, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance
View from Fort Welch Overlook image. Click for full size.
By Shane Oliver, July 18, 2015
3. View from Fort Welch Overlook
of this marker. A different marker also named Petersburg Battlefields (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); a different marker also named Petersburg Battlefields (about 600 feet away); a different marker also named Petersburg Battlefields (approx. 0.3 miles away); The Largest Fort (approx. 0.4 miles away); Siege of Petersburg—Grant's Fifth Offensive (approx. 0.4 miles away); A Mysterious Historic Feature (approx. 0.8 miles away); “A Great Struggle is Now Impending” (approx. 0.8 miles away); Fort Conahey (approx. 0.8 miles away). Click for a list of all markers in Petersburg.
 
More about this marker. Marker is located on the overlook at Union Fort Welch at the end of the walking trail. Fort Welch, along with Forts Gregg, Wheaton, Fisher, Conahey, Urmston, and Battery 27, guarded the left flank of the Union Line.
 
Categories. Forts, CastlesMilitaryWar, US Civil
 
View from Fort Welch Overlook image. Click for full size.
By Shane Oliver, July 18, 2015
4. View from Fort Welch Overlook
Entrance to Fort Welch image. Click for full size.
By Shane Oliver, July 18, 2015
5. Entrance to Fort Welch
View of the interior of Fort Welch image. Click for full size.
By Shane Oliver, July 18, 2015
6. View of the interior of Fort Welch
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Shane Oliver of Richmond, Virginia. This page has been viewed 281 times since then and 43 times this year. Photos:   1. submitted on , by Shane Oliver of Richmond, Virginia.   2. submitted on , by Bernard Fisher of Mechanicsville, Virginia.   3, 4, 5, 6. submitted on , by Shane Oliver of Richmond, Virginia. • Bernard Fisher was the editor who published this page. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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