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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Dauphin in Dauphin County, Pennsylvania — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Slavery at Fort Hunter

 
 
Slavery at Fort Hunter Marker image. Click for full size.
By Don Morfe, July 6, 2015
1. Slavery at Fort Hunter Marker
Inscription. From 1786 to the early 1830s, over twenty enslaved people lived and worked at Fort Hunter. Their parents and ancestors had been stolen from Africa. The McAllister family, who created all of Fort Hunter’s earliest surviving buildings, was one of the largest slave owners in Dauphin County. Along with free laborers, Blacks worked on the Fort Hunter plantation-farming, cooking, and running the dairy. Among them were at least two families, the Craigs and the Jenkins. At that time Fort Hunter included a farm, a tavern, a distillery and a mill.

Sall Craig fled from Fort Hunter bondage in 1828 when she was about 60. Although owned by the McAllisters since she was a girl, they had planned to sell her because of financial reversals. The sales advertisement described her as “strong and active of her age…an excellent washer, baker and cook and understands the management of a dairy and soap boiling.” By then small communities of free Blacks had formed in nearby Harrisburg and Halifax. Perhaps they provided aid and refuge to Sall, but nothing more is known of her story.

(Inscription under the image in the center left)
This woman ran away from slavery, just like Sall Craig had.

(Inscription under the image in the lower left)
In 2014, ground penetrating radar identified a total of nine graves, four of which are unmarked

Slavery at Fort Hunter Marker image. Click for full size.
By Don Morfe, July 6, 2015
2. Slavery at Fort Hunter Marker
at the African American cemetery that was once part of the Fort Hunter property.

(Inscription above the image in the upper right)
Known enslaved people that once lived at Fort Hunter;
Cato, Charles, Andrew Craig, Eliza Craig, Lucy Craig, Sall Craig, Daniel, George Hoofnagle, Hetty Gray, Isaac, Jack, son of Cato, James, Jem, Judy, Hallie Jenkins, Jack Jenkins, Maria Murry, Mary, Nance, Ned, Tyra.
 
Erected by Dauphin County.
 
Location. 40° 20.509′ N, 76° 54.576′ W. Marker is in Dauphin, Pennsylvania, in Dauphin County. Marker is on River Road. Click for map. The marker is in Fort Hunter Park. Marker is in this post office area: Dauphin PA 17018, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 2 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Pennsylvania Slavery (here, next to this marker); United States Slavery (here, next to this marker); Fort Hunter History (a few steps from this marker); Fort Hunter (within shouting distance of this marker); Simon Girty (within shouting distance of this marker); Rockville Bridge (approx. ¼ mile away); Village of Heckton (approx. 0.4 miles away); a different marker also named Rockville Bridge (approx. 1.2 miles away). Click for a list of all markers in Dauphin.
 
Categories. African AmericansForts, CastlesIndustry & Commerce

 
Slavery at Fort Hunter Marker image. Click for full size.
By Don Morfe, July 6, 2015
3. Slavery at Fort Hunter Marker
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Don Morfe of Baltimore, Md 21234. This page has been viewed 134 times since then and 3 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on , by Don Morfe of Baltimore, Md 21234. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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