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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Mobile in Mobile County, Alabama — The American South (East South Central)
 

James W. Roper

 
 
James W. Roper Marker image. Click for full size.
By Mark Hilton, July 26, 2015
1. James W. Roper Marker
Inscription.
Owner - Builder
of Oakleigh

Born 1801 in South Carolina
(day and month of birth unknown)

Died Jan. 12, 1856

 
Erected 1962 by the Historic Mobile Preservation Society.
 
Location. 30° 41.135′ N, 88° 3.019′ W. Marker is in Mobile, Alabama, in Mobile County. Marker can be reached from South Scott Street 0.1 miles south of Government Street (U.S. 98). Click for map. Marker located within Church Street Graveyard next to large truncated tree. Marker is at or near this postal address: South Scott Street, Mobile AL 36602, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Big Zion African Methodist Episcopal Zion Church (about 400 feet away, measured in a direct line); Old Church Street Cemetery - 1819 (about 500 feet away); The Quigley House (about 500 feet away); Home of Raphael Semmes (about 800 feet away); Shaarai Shomayim (approx. 0.2 miles away); The Bee Hive (approx. 0.2 miles away); Dr. H. Roger Williams (approx. mile away); Barton Academy (approx. mile away). Click for a list of all markers in Mobile.
 
Regarding James W. Roper. Roper was a brick mason, dry
Wide shot of marker in rear center of photo. image. Click for full size.
By Mark Hilton, July 26, 2015
2. Wide shot of marker in rear center of photo.
goods merchant and cotton broker from James City County, Virginia. He operated a Water Street brickyard in downtown Mobile on the present-day site of the RSA Battle House Tower.

Roper began building Oakleigh on 35 acres west of Mobile in 1833. Roper designed and built the house himself.

As a cotton trader, Roper was hit by the Panic of 1837. Unable to repay the $20,000 he had borrowed to build the house, he sold it to his brother-in-law Boyd Simison, who allowed him to live in it rent-free until 1850. Simison, bought Oakleigh, half of the estate's acreage, and all but one of Roper's 18 slaves. With his business interests failing, Roper followed his brother-in-law's example, becoming a lumber merchant and moving to New Orleans in 1850.
 
Related marker. Click here for another marker that is related to this marker.
 
Also see . . .  Oakleigh Historic Complex (Mobile, Alabama). (Submitted on July 28, 2015, by Mark Hilton of Montgomery, Alabama.)
 
Categories. Settlements & Settlers
 
James W. Roper gravesite image. Click for full size.
By Mark Hilton, July 26, 2015
3. James W. Roper gravesite
Church Street Graveyard entrance. image. Click for full size.
By Mark Hilton, July 26, 2015
4. Church Street Graveyard entrance.
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Mark Hilton of Montgomery, Alabama. This page has been viewed 163 times since then. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4. submitted on , by Mark Hilton of Montgomery, Alabama. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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