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Decatur in Morgan County, Alabama — The American South (East South Central)
 

“a place of importance” - Union Leadership at Decatur

“A Hard Nut To Crack”

 

—The Battle For Decatur —

 
“a place of importance” - Union Leadership at Decatur Marker image. Click for full size.
By Tim Carr, February 20, 2010
1. “a place of importance” - Union Leadership at Decatur Marker
Inscription. The Decatur crossing of the Tennessee River was used extensively by Union forces. In the Fall of 1863, elements of Major General William T. Sherman’s Army of the Tennessee passed through Decatur on their way from Vicksburg to Chattanooga. Union commands from the Army of the Tennessee spent the spring of 1864 camped at Decatur, and were inspected by Major General James B. McPherson and Sherman on March 25, 1864.

On March 8, 1864, Union Major General Grenville M. Dodge and the XVI Army Corps permanently occupied Decatur and constructed a pontoon bridge and substantial fortifications. You are near where the southern entrance to the pontoon bridge was in 1864-1865. After the Army of the Tennessee joined the Atlanta Campaign in late April, 1864, a permanent garrison commanded by Colonel Charles C. Doolittle of the 18th Michigan Infantry, and consisting of 1,500 infantry and seventeen pieces of artillery was established here. This garrison would substantially reinforced in October, 1864.

The Federal army briefly withdrew the garrison to reinforce Nashville on November 23, but Decatur was re-occupied by Major General James B. Steedman and a division of U. S. Colored Troops on December 27, 1864. Decatur was occupied by Union forces until the end of the war. The last known date that Federal troops were in Decatur was June
Tour Stop 6 image. Click for full size.
By Tim Carr
2. Tour Stop 6
30, 1865. After the war Grenville Dodge would go on to serve as Chief Engineer for the Union Pacific Railroad, responsible for the construction of the transcontinental railroad.
 
Erected by City of Decatur. (Marker Number 6.)
 
Location. 34° 37.009′ N, 86° 59.07′ W. Marker is in Decatur, Alabama, in Morgan County. Marker is at the intersection of Sycamore Street Northwest and Market Street Northwest, on the left when traveling north on Sycamore Street Northwest. Click for map. Marker is in this post office area: Decatur AL 35602, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Burleson House (circa 1836) (here, next to this marker); Schaudies - Banks Cottage (within shouting distance of this marker); Two Bridges Across The Tennessee River (about 700 feet away, measured in a direct line); Dancy-Polk House (circa 1829) (approx. 0.2 miles away); Confederate Leadership at Decatur - McCartney Hotel Site (approx. 0.2 miles away); First Railroad (approx. 0.2 miles away); Old State Bank Building (approx. 0.2 miles away); Decatur and The Civil War in North Alabama (approx. 0.2 miles away). Click for a list of all markers in Decatur.
 
Categories. War, US Civil
 
The Pontoon Bridge Across the Tennessee River image. Click for full size.
By Tim Carr, February 20, 2010
3. The Pontoon Bridge Across the Tennessee River
The Pontoon Bridge Across the Tennessee River at Decatur. Piers from destroyed Memphis & Charleston Railroad bridge are upstream. Attributed to the D. R. Cubbison Collection.
Dodge & Sherman image. Click for full size.
By Tim Carr, February 20, 2010
4. Dodge & Sherman
Top: Union Major General Grenville M. Dodge (Original artwork by Chuck Brown White Star Consulting, 1998)

Bottom: Union Major General William T. Sherman (D. R. Cubbison Collection)
Site of the Pontoon Bridge Crossing next to the current Railroad Bridge image. Click for full size.
By Tim Carr, February 20, 2010
5. Site of the Pontoon Bridge Crossing next to the current Railroad Bridge
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Timothy Carr of Birmingham, Alabama. This page has been viewed 1,038 times since then and 3 times this year. Last updated on , by J. Makali Bruton of Querétaro, Mexico. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5. submitted on , by Timothy Carr of Birmingham, Alabama. • Bernard Fisher was the editor who published this page. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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