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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Dickerson in Montgomery County, Maryland — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Linden Farm

A Living, thriving slice of Maryland history

 
 
Linden Farm Marker image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, July 26, 2015
1. Linden Farm Marker
Inscription. Prior to 1840, virtually all Montgomery County farms produced tobacco and corn primary crops of the era. In 1845, the emergence of guano fertilizer allowed farmer to Introduce a new Cash crop grain which provided feed for livestock.

The 1873 opening of the nearby Dlckerson Train Station on the Metropolitan Railroad provided access to a viable market for grain and cattle. These two occurrences gave birth to a regional economic boom.

To support his burgeoning business, owner Laurence A. White and his wife, Annie built a Feed and Bank Barn, a Board and Batten Cottage, a Corncrib, and a Carriage House which later became a Tractor Shed. Together with their seven children, the family raised wheat, corn, milk cows, and sheep from 1883 until 1919.

When White retired In 1919, George and Mabel Furzer purchased the property and business continued to thrive until the Great Depression when bankruptcy forced the farm into sale at a Sheriff's Auction. Walter Matthews purchased the property for $7,500 In 1932.

Typical of the 1930s new breed of farmer, known as the entrepreneur, Furzer – recognizing the unpredictable impact of weather conditions on cash crops – shifted production exclusively to dairy. He added loafing sheds behind the barn and silo. In 1935, Matthews converted part of the farm into a
Board and Batten Cottage image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, July 26, 2015
2. Board and Batten Cottage
On left, original building from the late 1800s,and pictured on right after renovations in 2003.
Close-up of photos on marker
neighborhood gathering spot for picnics, celebrations and parties.

In 1980, Montgomery County purchased the property from the Matthews family. While maintaining the rustic 19th century look of the property and structures, they converted some of the premises Into an Interim sludge compost facility (that closed In 1983) and later Into a leaf compost facility. Today, the newly-renovated Montgomery County Yard Trim Compost Facility recycles grass and leaves, into compost, sold at area stores under the names brand LeefGRO and ComPRO.

Recent Renovation

The original farmhouse, located near the property entrance was destroyed by fire in 1990.

Two years later, the Gothic Barn was designated on the Montgomery County Plan for Historic Preservation as one of the only three gothic roofed dairy barns in the County. Now leased to the Sugarloaf Citizens Association, the Gothic Barn, the Feed and Bank Barns, Corn Crib and Board and Batten House have been fully renovated.
 
Location. 39° 11.864′ N, 77° 26.897′ W. Marker is in Dickerson, Maryland, in Montgomery County. Marker can be reached from Martinsburg Road. Click for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 20900 Martinsburg Road, Dickerson MD 20842, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 2 miles of this
Linden Farm Marker image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, July 26, 2015
3. Linden Farm Marker
marker, measured as the crow flies. Seneca Stone Barn (approx. 0.8 miles away); Washington's Farm (approx. 1.1 miles away); White’s Ford (approx. 1.1 miles away); a different marker also named White's Ford (approx. 1.5 miles away); Brewer Farmstead (approx. 1.6 miles away); Equestrian Heritage (approx. 1.6 miles away); Springing Over the Monocacy (approx. 1.6 miles away); African American Soldiers from Montgomery County (approx. 1.7 miles away). Click for a list of all markers in Dickerson.
 
Categories. AgricultureMan-Made Features
 
Aerial Photo of Linden Farm in the early 1900s. image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, July 26, 2015
4. Aerial Photo of Linden Farm in the early 1900s.
Close-up of photo on marker
Current Uses image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, July 26, 2015
5. Current Uses
Today, these facilities showcase the typical life of a rural Montgomery County dairy barn of of the late 19th and early 20th century. The facility is open for public and private tours, school groups, and other educational functions.
Close-up of photo on marker
Feed Barn, Major Renovations in Progress. image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, July 26, 2015
6. Feed Barn, Major Renovations in Progress.
Close-up of photo on marker
Feed Barn, After Renovation image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, July 26, 2015
7. Feed Barn, After Renovation
Close-up of photo on marker
Board and Batten Cottage image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, July 26, 2015
8. Board and Batten Cottage
Board and Batten Cottage image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, July 26, 2015
9. Board and Batten Cottage
Feed Barn image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, July 26, 2015
10. Feed Barn
Loafing Shed image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, July 26, 2015
11. Loafing Shed
Gothic Barn image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, July 26, 2015
12. Gothic Barn
Tractor Shed image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, July 26, 2015
13. Tractor Shed
LeafGRO image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, July 26, 2015
14. LeafGRO
Resource Recovery Facility image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, July 26, 2015
15. Resource Recovery Facility
The leaf composting yard and the incinerator just across the fence
Historic Stone Fence image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, July 26, 2015
16. Historic Stone Fence
The Seneca sandstone walls that line this section of Martinsburg Road are one of the features that make it an exceptional rustic road.
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland. This page has been viewed 285 times since then and 11 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16. submitted on , by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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