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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Seattle in King County, Washington — The American West (Northwest)
 

Carkeep Park

 
 
Carkeep Park Marker image. Click for full size.
By Marsha A. Matson, July 25, 2015
1. Carkeep Park Marker
Inscription. Carkeep Park is an urban oasis. The salt water beach, the salmon bearing stream, wetlands, forest, picnic tables, play areas and miles of trails welcome visitors with new discoveries year round.

The land once occupied by early Salish peoples was known as K'aalab or "leave it alone" by the Shilshole band of the Duwamish. By the 1920s, the forests of the park had been cut and the remaining land was left as meadows or used for dairy farming. Erosion and sewage polluted the creek, sickened homesteaders downstream and exterminated the Piper's Creek salmon population.

The Piper family sold their property to Morgan J. Carkeek who donated it to the city as part of a land exchange. In 1929, this section of the Piper's Creek watershed was dedicated as Carkeek Park.
 
Erected by Seattle Parks and Recreation.
 
Location. 47° 42.697′ N, 122° 22.33′ W. Marker is in Seattle, Washington, in King County. Click for map. Enter the park at the Eddie McAbee Entrance on NW 100th Place, near 6th Ave NW. Marker is at or near this postal address: 950 NW Carkeek Park Rd., Seattle WA 98117, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 6 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Mural at Bergen Place (approx. 3.1 miles away);
Carkeek Park trail image. Click for full size.
By Marsha A. Matson, July 25, 2015
2. Carkeek Park trail
Ballard Avenue Landmark District Historic Marker Project (approx. 3.1 miles away); Ballard Avenue Historic District / Ballard City Hall Bell (approx. 3.1 miles away); Hiram M. Chittenden Locks (approx. 3.3 miles away); Seattle Fisherman's Memorial (approx. 3.9 miles away); Lenin in Fremont (approx. 4.3 miles away); The Fremont Troll (approx. 4.3 miles away); 1890 Seattle Fire Department Bell (approx. 5.7 miles away). Click for a list of all markers in Seattle.
 
Regarding Carkeep Park. Carkeek Park is a 216 acre park in northwest Seattle, adjacent to the Broadview neighborhood, offering hiking trails, play and picnic areas, and a pedestrian bridge that leads over the BNSF Railway tracks to a sand beach on Puget Sound. Pipers Orchard, with fruit and nut trees, and Pipers Creek, an urban stream that empties into the Sound, have both been restored here after years of hard work by neighbors, volunteers and city workers. (Excerpted from www.seattle.gov/tour/carkeek.htm)
 
Also see . . .  Carkeep Park
Carkeek Park Piper's Orchard Marker image. Click for full size.
By Marsha A. Matson, July 25, 2015
3. Carkeek Park Piper's Orchard Marker
. Washington Trails Association website (Submitted on July 31, 2015, by Marsha A. Matson of Palmetto Bay, Florida.) 
 
Categories. EnvironmentHorticulture & ForestryNative Americans
 
Piper's Orchard Marker image. Click for full size.
By Marsha A. Matson, July 25, 2015
4. Piper's Orchard Marker
Piper's Orchard image. Click for full size.
By Marsha A. Matson, July 25, 2015
5. Piper's Orchard
Piper's Orchard is in Carkeek Park.
Minna and Andrew Piper image. Click for full size.
By Marsha A. Matson, July 25, 2015
6. Minna and Andrew Piper
Andrew W. Piper was a professional baker, a city council member, a Seattle mayoral candidate, and a newspaper cartoonist. After the Seattle Great Fire of 1889 destroyed his bakery, A.W. moved with his wife Minna and his extended family to cabins abandoned by loggers on this site. The Pipers planted this orchard along with extensive vegetable and flower gardens. The heirs of A.W. sold the land to the Carkeek family, who donated it to the city in 1927.
Orchard tree image. Click for full size.
By Marsha A. Matson, July 25, 2015
7. Orchard tree
The land remained fallow until early 1983, when a group of orchard enthusiasts walking along Piper's Creek trail discovered among the overgrowth, apple trees planted in an orderly fashion. Volunteers cleared the area of alders, maples, and blackberry bushes, pruned the surviving 32 original trees and planted additional fruit and nut varieties popular in the early 1900s.
View of orchard image. Click for full size.
By Marsha A. Matson, July 25, 2015
8. View of orchard
Most of the trees are varieties of apples not available now, including Wealthy, King of Tompkins County, Dutch Mignone, Red Astrican, Rhode Island Greening, Beitigheimer, and Esopus Spitzenberg. Several varieties of pear, quince, filbert, hickory, and walnut trees can also be found.
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Marsha A. Matson of Palmetto Bay, Florida. This page has been viewed 136 times since then and 3 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8. submitted on , by Marsha A. Matson of Palmetto Bay, Florida. • Andrew Ruppenstein was the editor who published this page. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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