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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Beallsville in Montgomery County, Maryland — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

African American Soldiers from Montgomery County

1861-1865

 
 
African American Soldiers from Montgomery County Marker image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, July 26, 2015
1. African American Soldiers from Montgomery County Marker
Inscription.
Black men — both free and enslaved — were called upon to fight in the Civil War which ultimately led to the dismantlement of slavery, that ‘peculiar institution.’

As the Civil War dragged on, the state newspapers exaggerated that the percentage of able bodied men in Maryland produced conscriptions (or drafts) where “the proportion of colored persons drawn in [sic] largely excess of whites.” Of the 1,913 local men who faced draft in 1863, only 329 were African American. Just like their free black counterparts, enslaved men were given name recognition in the published draft lists.

Some enslaved men did not wait to be drafted and dictated their own fate. Court records reveal that a few were manumitted or freed by their owners to enlist in the U.S. Army. Freedom papers identified enslaved men such as Robert Oliver Scott of Brookeville as being released from bondage with “freedom to commence” military duty. Scott ultimately joined the 30th Regiment of the U.S. Colored Troops, where he saw combat in Virginia and North Carolina. While serving in the South, black soldiers faced racial tension and were referred to as “smoked Yankees” by local residents.

I remember when the Yankee and Confederate soldiers both came to Poolesville.
African American Soldiers from Montgomery County Marker image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, July 26, 2015
2. African American Soldiers from Montgomery County Marker
Capn Sam White he join the Confederate in Virginia. He come home and say he goin' to take me along back with him for to serve him. But the Yankees came and he left very sudden and leave me behind I was glad I didn't have to go with him.
” Reverend Phillip Johnson, formerly enslaved in Poolesville.
September 14,1937 Oral Interview. Federal Writers Project of WPA. Library of Congress

On July 17, 1862, Congress passed the Second Confiscation and Militia Act, which allowed the use of African Americans in federal service. They could not serve in combat, however, until the Emancipation Proclamation as issued on January 1, 1863.
 
Location. 39° 11.429′ N, 77° 25.114′ W. Marker is in Beallsville, Maryland, in Montgomery County. Marker can be reached from Darnestown Road (Maryland Route 28) one mile north of Beallsville Road (Route 109), on the right when traveling north. Click for map. Marker is located in the Woodstock Equestrian Park. Marker is at or near this postal address: 20207 Darnestown Road, Beallsville MD 20839, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 2 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Equestrian Heritage (about 400 feet away, measured in a direct line); Brewer Farmstead (about 600 feet away); Washington's Farm
Harper's Weekly 28 June 1890 image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, July 26, 2015
3. Harper's Weekly 28 June 1890
Close-up of image on marker
(approx. ¾ mile away); In Loving Memory (approx. ¾ mile away); Beallsville (approx. 0.8 miles away); Seneca Stone Barn (approx. 1.4 miles away); Linden Farm (approx. 1.7 miles away); Historic Site [ B&O RR station] (approx. 2.1 miles away). Click for a list of all markers in Beallsville.
 
Categories. African AmericansWar, US Civil
 
Unidentified Union Soldier and Family image. Click for full size.
Library of Congress
4. Unidentified Union Soldier and Family
This ambrotype, c. 1863 - 1865, shows an unidentified Union soldier with his wife and daughters. It is believed that he served in one of seven U.S.C.T. regiments raised in Maryland.
LOC photo used on marker
Muster Roll image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, July 26, 2015
5. Muster Roll
Muster roll of 1863 showing white and “colored” men who were drafted into military service from Montgomery County.
“Johnson, Charles; 29; Colored; Laborer; Married”
Close-up of image on marker
Slave Statistics image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, July 26, 2015
6. Slave Statistics
The Slave Statistics listed at least 144 enslaved men from Montgomery County who allegedly joined Union forces prior to emancipation in November 1864. George Brewer recorded that one slave, Charles Johnson, left his Beallsville farm for the military. (Sentinel, 13 December 1861)
“Charles Johnson, Male, 40, Healthy, for life, Servt in the Military.”
Close-up of image on marker
Union Army Cook image. Click for full size.
Library of Congress
7. Union Army Cook
Union army cook shown here in City Point - West Point, Virginia, c. 1861 - 1865.
LOC photo used on marker
Company E. 4th USCI at Fort Lincoln image. Click for full size.
Library of Congress
8. Company E. 4th USCI at Fort Lincoln
Shown here are members of Company E, 4th U.S. Colored Infantry, at Fort Lincoln, District of Columbia.
LOC of photo used on marker
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland. This page has been viewed 190 times since then and 8 times this year. Last updated on , by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8. submitted on , by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland. • Kevin W. was the editor who published this page. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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