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Fort Laramie in Goshen County, Wyoming — The American West (Mountains)
 

Fort John – The ‘Second Fort Laramie’

Fort Laramie National Historic Site

 
 
Fort John – The ‘Second Fort Laramie’ Marker image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, August 2, 2015
1. Fort John – The ‘Second Fort Laramie’ Marker
Inscription.
. . . the articles of trade consist, on the one side, almost entirely of buffalo robes; and, on the other, of blankets, calicoes, guns, powder, and lead, [and] . . . cheap ornaments such as glass beads, looking-glasses, rings, vermillion for painting, tobacco, and . . . spirits, brought into the country in the form of alcohol, and diluted with water before sold . . .
John C. Frémont, July 1842

Pierre Chouteau and Company, then owners of Fort William, constructed a new fort on this site in 1841 to better compete with nearby rival trading posts. Built of adobe by Mexican craftsmen, Fort John cost $10,000 to complete.

Fifteen-foot-high walls, measuring 121 by 167 feet, protected living quarters, shops for blacksmiths, and warehouses. Towers – called bastions – positioned at opposite corners of the fort and large double main doors gave the fort an impressive appearance.

Indian tribes, especially the Lakota, traded tanned buffalo robes at Fort John for a variety of manufactured goods. Throughout the 1840s the take of buffalo robes declined and Fort John’s role soon changed.

In 1841, the first of many westward-bound emigrants arrived at Fort John. Thousands of emigrants bound for Oregon, California, and the Salt Lake Valley would eventually stop at the adobe fort. Traders
Fort John – The ‘Second Fort Laramie’ Marker image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, August 2, 2015
2. Fort John – The ‘Second Fort Laramie’ Marker
at Fort John did a brisk seasonal business catering to the needs of the emigrants.

A few busy weeks of summer emigrant trade, however, did not make up for poor returns in the fur business. When the U.S. Army offered to purchase Fort John in 1849, the owners jumped at the opportunity and sold it for $4,000 on June 26. The army used the “old” fort largely as a corral and warehouse until its demolition in 1862.
 
Erected by National Park Service.
 
Location. 42° 12.065′ N, 104° 33.544′ W. Marker is in Fort Laramie, Wyoming, in Goshen County. Marker can be reached from Wyoming Route 160, on the left when traveling west. Click for map. Marker is located at Fort Laramie National Historic Site. Marker is in this post office area: Fort Laramie WY 82212, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Fort William and the Fur Trade (here, next to this marker); The “Government Workhouse” (within shouting distance of this marker); Between Two Worlds . . . the American Métis (within shouting distance of this marker); Captain’s Quarters (within shouting distance of this marker); Reading, ‘Riting, and ‘Rithmetic
Marker at Fort Laramie image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, August 2, 2015
3. Marker at Fort Laramie
(about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); Refinement at Fort Laramie (about 300 feet away); Administration Building (about 400 feet away); Officers Quarters (about 400 feet away). Click for a list of all markers in Fort Laramie.
 
More about this marker. A large painting of “Fort John” by William H. Jackson appears at the bottom of the marker. The upper right of the marker features an 1858 photograph depicting a general view of Fort Laramie showing Fort John near the river.
 
Also see . . .  Fort Laramie National Historic Site. (Submitted on August 10, 2015, by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey.)
 
Categories. ExplorationForts, CastlesIndustry & Commerce
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey. This page has been viewed 130 times since then and 4 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on , by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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