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MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Near Stanton in Jefferson County, Mississippi — The American South (East South Central)
 

Mount Locust

 
 
Mount Locust as an Inn Marker image. Click for full size.
By Duane Hall, August 4, 2015
1. Mount Locust as an Inn Marker
Marker #1
Inscription.
(Marker #1)
Mount Locust as an Inn
Growing traffic on the Trace gave Ferguson opportunity to develop Mount Locust.

After 1795, the Mississippi was legally opened for American traffic. Settlers floated their products downriver and sold them at Natchez or New Orleans. Most of them walked back over the Natchez Trace, because their boats could not go upstream.

(List Caption)
An 1812 almanac lists the taverns on the Trace. Mount Locust was at “Union Town.” Laid out by Ferguson in 1799, the “town” had an inn, a tannery, and a few houses.

(Image Captions)
The kitchen was a separate building. Excavations in 1941 show its brick floor.

Archeologists uncovered the remains of a brick walk to “Sleepy Hollow,” the guest house Ferguson built as business boomed. Travelers slept at Sleepy Hollow, but went to the main house for meals.

(Marker #2)
Mount Locust - A Home
Mount Locust grew with the family and the region into the “Big House” of a fair-size plantation.

(Graphic Captions)
Partial inventory of Mount Locust furnishings in 1801. Most furniture seems to have been made of local materials. Tableware and the looking glass probably were imported from
Mount Locust - A Home Marker image. Click for full size.
By Duane Hall, August 4, 2015
2. Mount Locust - A Home Marker
Philadelphia.

Oak and sassafras were used for framing.

Clapboard and furniture came from heart poplar.

Alterations can often be dated by the kind of nails and screws.

Original late 18th century–Pit saw or whip (Hand Power)

Early 19th century additions–Mill sawn vertical power driven (Horse Power)

Late 19th century–Circular saw additions (Steam Power)

Complicated joints in the older construction show skilled craftsmanship.
 
Erected by National Park Service.
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the Natchez Trace marker series.
 
Location. 31° 41.214′ N, 91° 11.359′ W. Marker is near Stanton, Mississippi, in Jefferson County. Marker can be reached from Natchez Trace Parkway (at milepost 15.5), 0.2 miles south of Cannonsburg Road. Click for map. Marker is located at the Mount Locust turnout behind the ranger station / restroom building. Marker is in this post office area: Natchez MS 39120, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 7 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. A different marker also named Mount Locust (a few steps from this marker); Bullen Creek (approx. 2.7 miles away but has been reported missing);
Places Along the Road from Natchez to Pittsburg image. Click for full size.
By Duane Hall, August 4, 2015
3. Places Along the Road from Natchez to Pittsburg
Close-up of Mount Locust as an Inn marker
Loess Bluff (approx. 3 miles away); Emerald Mound (approx. 4.9 miles away); a different marker also named Emerald Mound (approx. 4.9 miles away); a different marker also named Emerald Mound (approx. 4.9 miles away); Old Trace (approx. 6.4 miles away); A National Road (approx. 6.4 miles away). Click for a list of all markers in Stanton.
 
Also see . . .
1. Natchez Trace Parkway. Official National Park Service website. (Submitted on August 16, 2015.) 

2. Kaintucks to Cotton. Brochure on Mount Locust from the National Park Service. (Submitted on August 16, 2015.) 
 
Categories. Industry & CommerceRoads & Vehicles
 
Mount Locust Exhibit Markers image. Click for full size.
By Duane Hall, August 4, 2015
4. Mount Locust Exhibit Markers
Ranger Station / Restroom Building image. Click for full size.
By Duane Hall, August 4, 2015
5. Ranger Station / Restroom Building
Markers (at left end of building) are located behind the building on the path to the restored Mount Locust
Mount Locust image. Click for full size.
By Duane Hall, August 4, 2015
6. Mount Locust
The Natchez Trace passed in front of the building
Front Porch of Mount Locust image. Click for full size.
By Duane Hall, August 4, 2015
7. Front Porch of Mount Locust
Back Side of Mount Locust image. Click for full size.
By Duane Hall, August 4, 2015
8. Back Side of Mount Locust
Interior of Room in Mount Locust image. Click for full size.
By Duane Hall, August 4, 2015
9. Interior of Room in Mount Locust
Inns Along the Trace Interpretive Sign<br>In Front of the Mount Locust Inn image. Click for full size.
By Duane Hall, August 4, 2015
10. Inns Along the Trace Interpretive Sign
In Front of the Mount Locust Inn
Inns Along the Trace Interpretive Sign image. Click for full size.
By Duane Hall, August 4, 2015
11. Inns Along the Trace Interpretive Sign
Mount Locust remains as the only one of more than 50 inns that existed between 1785 and 1830 along the 500 mile Old Trace. It has been restored to its 1810 appearance, the time when travel on this historic road reached its peak.
Frontier Homes Interpretive Sign<br>Along Stairway to the Mount Locust Inn image. Click for full size.
By Duane Hall, August 4, 2015
12. Frontier Homes Interpretive Sign
Along Stairway to the Mount Locust Inn
Frontier Homes Interpretive Sign image. Click for full size.
By Duane Hall, August 4, 2015
13. Frontier Homes Interpretive Sign
Mount Locust as a “frontier” home was probably considered lavish by early 1800 standards, as many farmstead homes of this period were crude, one-room log cabins. Access to the luxuries of nearby Natchez probably helped make life easier for those who lived here.
Soap Making Interpretive Sign<br>Next to Hopper image. Click for full size.
By Duane Hall, August 4, 2015
14. Soap Making Interpretive Sign
Next to Hopper
Soap Making Interpretive Sign image. Click for full size.
By Duane Hall, August 4, 2015
15. Soap Making Interpretive Sign
Ashes from wood burning fires were saved, stored in this hopper and used to make wood ash lye. After being concentrated, the lye was slowly added to melted animal fat and brought to a slow boil. After cooling, the soap was cut into bars.
Cistern image. Click for full size.
By Duane Hall, August 4, 2015
16. Cistern
Cisterns Interpretive Sign image. Click for full size.
By Duane Hall, August 4, 2015
17. Cisterns Interpretive Sign
Ground water was a precious commodity, especially during a dry year. As an alternative source, rain water was collected and stored in a hand dug, brick lined hole in the ground called a cistern. The water was then drawn from the cistern by buckets for daily use on the farm.
Mount Locust Slave Cemetery image. Click for full size.
By Duane Hall, August 4, 2015
18. Mount Locust Slave Cemetery
Mount Locust Slave Cemetery Marker image. Click for full size.
By Duane Hall, August 4, 2015
19. Mount Locust Slave Cemetery Marker
Before you is the Mount Locust slave cemetery. Only one unmarked stone remains. The names of persons known to be buried here are listed below.
Cielious Washington Marcus Perryman John White Gabriel Tyler Richmond Tyler Jackson Turner Tommy Turner William Turner Abraham Allen Esther Jackson
Riving or Shake-Making Interpretive Sign<br>Along Trail behind Mount Locust Inn image. Click for full size.
By Duane Hall, August 4, 2015
20. Riving or Shake-Making Interpretive Sign
Along Trail behind Mount Locust Inn
Riving or Shake-Making Interpretive Sign image. Click for full size.
By Duane Hall, August 4, 2015
21. Riving or Shake-Making Interpretive Sign
Riving is the process of prying a shake (shingle) or rough board from a log section using a froe and mallet. Shakes had numerous uses, such as the shingles in the roof of the house or the siding on the blacksmith shop.
Old Trace Path Interpretive Sign<br>Along Trail to Family Cemetery and Old Trace image. Click for full size.
By Duane Hall, August 4, 2015
22. Old Trace Path Interpretive Sign
Along Trail to Family Cemetery and Old Trace
Old Trace Path Interpretive Sign image. Click for full size.
By Duane Hall, August 4, 2015
23. Old Trace Path Interpretive Sign
A 10-minute walk down this trail takes you past several features associated with Mount Locust during the early 1800 period. Upon reaching the Old Trace and turning left, your approach to Mount Locus is the same as those “Kaintuck” boatmen of nearly 200 years ago.
Field Road between Red Cedar Trees image. Click for full size.
By Duane Hall, August 4, 2015
24. Field Road between Red Cedar Trees
Old Field Road Interpretive Sign image. Click for full size.
By Duane Hall, August 4, 2015
25. Old Field Road Interpretive Sign
This row of old red cedars probably lined a road leading to a distant field long since overgrown. One can only imagine the people, wagons, and animals that traveled back and forth several times daily between Mount Locust and adjacent fields.
Ferguson-Chamberlain Family Cemetery image. Click for full size.
By Duane Hall, August 4, 2015
26. Ferguson-Chamberlain Family Cemetery
Family Cemetery Interpretive Sign image. Click for full size.
By Duane Hall, August 4, 2015
27. Family Cemetery Interpretive Sign
In this quiet, secluded cemetery lie the remains of the founder of the Mount Locust Inn, William Ferguson, and his widow, Paulina Burch (Ferguson-Chamberlain). Here too, are four of their six sons and two additional sons by her later marriage to James Chamberlain. Other gravestones mark the final resting places for various members of five generations of the Chamberlain family. Robert Law, an Inn guest who died in 1825, is also buried here.
Grave Site of William Ferguson image. Click for full size.
By Duane Hall, August 4, 2015
28. Grave Site of William Ferguson
William Ferguson Interpretive Sign image. Click for full size.
By Duane Hall, August 4, 2015
29. William Ferguson Interpretive Sign
This marker designates the walled-in brick tomb of William Ferguson, 1756-1801. He was a pioneer, planter, innkeeper, magistrate, and builder of Mt. Locust.
Building Materials Interpretive Sign<br>Along Trail to Old Trace image. Click for full size.
By Duane Hall, August 4, 2015
30. Building Materials Interpretive Sign
Along Trail to Old Trace
Building Materials Interpretive Sign image. Click for full size.
By Duane Hall, August 4, 2015
31. Building Materials Interpretive Sign
Perhaps the lumber to build the original 1-room, 16- by 20- foot house in the late 1770's was cut from these woods. One popular story is that some of the lumber for the houses was salvaged from flatboats which carried goods from Ohio and Kentucky to Natchez.
Remnants of the Brick Kiln image. Click for full size.
By Duane Hall, August 4, 2015
32. Remnants of the Brick Kiln
Brick Kiln Interpretive Sign image. Click for full size.
By Duane Hall, August 4, 2015
33. Brick Kiln Interpretive Sign
Brick kilns were an essential feature of early settlements since bricks were an important building material. Although only the scattered brick fragments remain to mark the site of this kiln, the bricks made here years ago can still be seen in walks and chimneys at Mount Locust.
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Duane Hall of Abilene, Texas. This page has been viewed 187 times since then and 22 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9. submitted on , by Duane Hall of Abilene, Texas.   10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33. submitted on , by Duane Hall of Abilene, Texas. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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