“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Vancouver in Clark County, Washington — The American West (Northwest)

The Infantry Barracks


—Officers Row —

The Infantry Barracks Marker image. Click for full size.
By Kevin W., June 16, 2008
1. The Infantry Barracks Marker
Inscription. The Infantry Barracks is the oldest surviving structure in Vancouver Barracks proper. It was constructed in 1887, one of three identical buildings built to house individual companies of the 14th Infantry. Though it was built prior to the standardization of architecture at army posts, the Infantry Barracks shows only slight modifications to an 1872 design issued by Quartermaster General Meigs. It is a simple, Classic Revival style building, and originally had a porch on the second story as well as the first. The offices, store rooms, day room, dining room, kitchen, and other related speces were on the bottom floor. The top floor was an open dormitory for 48 men, known as the “Squad Room.”
Erected by Vancouver National Historic Reserve.
Marker series. This marker is included in the Buffalo Soldiers marker series.
Location. 45° 37.652′ N, 122° 39.972′ W. Marker is in Vancouver, Washington, in Clark County. Marker is at the intersection of Barnes Street and McClellan Road, on the right when traveling south on Barnes Street. Click for map. Marker is in this post office area: Vancouver WA 98661, United States of America.
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. The Post Hospital (within
The Infantry Barracks and Marker image. Click for full size.
By Kevin W., June 16, 2008
2. The Infantry Barracks and Marker
shouting distance of this marker); The Red Cross Convalescent House (about 500 feet away, measured in a direct line); The Artillery Barracks (about 500 feet away); Clark County Veterans Memorial (about 500 feet away); The O. O. Howard House (about 500 feet away); The Sutler's Store (about 500 feet away); The Reservation Monument (about 700 feet away); St. James Mission (about 700 feet away). Click for a list of all markers in Vancouver.
More about this marker. A picture of Sergeant Edward Gibson graces the marker, in the upper left. It is captioned, "A company of African American “Buffalo Soldiers” billeted there in 1899-1900. Company B of the 24th Infantry served as the post’s regular garrison, including Sgt. Edward Gibson, seen here early in his career. Company B responded to civil unrest at Idaho mines, playing a role in one of the century’s major labor conflicts. The soldiers also participated in community events, including parades, ceremonies, and baseball games." It was provide for use on the marker, "Courtesy of the Frontier
Sergeant Edward Gibson, Company B, 24th Infantry image. Click for full size.
By Kevin W., June 16, 2008
3. Sergeant Edward Gibson, Company B, 24th Infantry
Picture is taken from the marker.
Army Museum, Fort Leavenworth, Kansas."

The background picture, taken inside the "Squad Room," identifies the space each soldier could call his own. "In the barracks’ Squad Room each soldier was allowed 800 cubic feet of space. With 12 foot ceilings, this meant each had an area a little over ten by six feet." It was provided to Vancouver National Historic Reserve courtesy of the National Archives, #92-F-71-6."
Categories. African AmericansForts, CastlesMilitary
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Kevin W. of Stafford, Virginia. This page has been viewed 1,234 times since then and 82 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on , by Kevin W. of Stafford, Virginia. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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