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MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Near Kosciusko in Attala County, Mississippi — The American South (East South Central)
 

Hurricane Creek

 
 
Hurricane Creek Marker image. Click for full size.
By Duane Hall, August 5, 2015
1. Hurricane Creek Marker
Inscription. Plants need water as much as men need money. Some are satisfied with little; some cannot flourish unless they have a lot; the majority can live contentedly with medium amounts.
     From here, a trail descends to the vegetation that thrives in the wet bottomland along Hurricane Creek. The path winds upward among plants growing in soil of medium dampness and on to the top of a dry hill before returning here.
     The differences in vegetation are due largely to the varying water content of the soil.
 
Erected by National Park Service.
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the Natchez Trace marker series.
 
Location. 33° 4.954′ N, 89° 31.548′ W. Marker is near Kosciusko, Mississippi, in Attala County. Marker is on Natchez Trace Parkway (at milepost 164.3), 1.3 miles south of Mississippi Highway 12, on the left when traveling north. Click for map. Marker is in this post office area: Kosciusko MS 39090, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 3 other markers are within 12 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. MFWC Birthplace (approx. 4.1 miles away); Cole Creek (approx. 11.1 miles away); Bethel Mission (approx. 11.7 miles away).
 
Also see . . .
Hurricane Creek Marker Next to Nature Trail Head image. Click for full size.
By Duane Hall, August 5, 2015
2. Hurricane Creek Marker Next to Nature Trail Head
 Natchez Trace Parkway. Official National Park Service website. (Submitted on August 21, 2015.) 
 
Categories. Environment
 
View to Northeast From Natchez Trace Parkway image. Click for full size.
By Duane Hall, August 5, 2015
3. View to Northeast From Natchez Trace Parkway
Marker is on left (west) side of parkway
The Start of the Hurricane Creek Nature Trail image. Click for full size.
By Duane Hall, August 5, 2015
4. The Start of the Hurricane Creek Nature Trail
American Beech Trees image. Click for full size.
By Duane Hall, August 5, 2015
5. American Beech Trees
American Beech Interpretive Sign image. Click for full size.
By Duane Hall, August 5, 2015
6. American Beech Interpretive Sign
American beech grows in the rich moist bottom land soils of the south. Its smooth soft gray bark is often the target of vandals.
White Oak Tree image. Click for full size.
By Duane Hall, August 5, 2015
7. White Oak Tree
White Oak Interpretive Sign image. Click for full size.
By Duane Hall, August 5, 2015
8. White Oak Interpretive Sign
As you start up the hill you will notice a definite change in vegetation. White oak can grow in very moist bottom soil but prefers the slightly drier soils of the low hillside.
Ferns image. Click for full size.
By Duane Hall, August 5, 2015
9. Ferns
Ferns Interpretive Sign image. Click for full size.
By Duane Hall, August 5, 2015
10. Ferns Interpretive Sign
Ferns are another good indicator of moist soil. Some of these ferns such as the Christmas fern remain green year round.
Hickory Tree image. Click for full size.
By Duane Hall, August 5, 2015
11. Hickory Tree
Hickory Interpretive Sign image. Click for full size.
By Duane Hall, August 5, 2015
12. Hickory Interpretive Sign
The soil becomes thinner and less able to hold moisture as you proceed up the hill. Hickory and other hardwoods thrive under these conditions.
Southern Pine image. Click for full size.
By Duane Hall, August 5, 2015
13. Southern Pine
Southern Pine Interpretive Sign image. Click for full size.
By Duane Hall, August 5, 2015
14. Southern Pine Interpretive Sign
Hilltops and ridges usually have thin sandy soils, ideal for the southern pine. If you look back down the hill you can almost see a line where the pines started growing.
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Duane Hall of Abilene, Texas. This page has been viewed 172 times since then and 11 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on , by Duane Hall of Abilene, Texas.   4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14. submitted on , by Duane Hall of Abilene, Texas. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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