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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Washington in Washington, District of Columbia — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Harry Wardman

 
 
Harry Wardman Marker image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, August 16, 2015
1. Harry Wardman Marker
Inscription. The name Harry Wardman (1872 - 1938) is practically synonymous with Woodley Park, having built numerous houses and apartments in the neighborhood. Wardman built his own home on the corner of Connecticut Avenue and Woodley Road in 1909. He later constructed an imposing 1,200-room hotel nearby, dubbed “Warman's Folly” by some for what was considered its remote location.

In 1929 Wardman tore down his mansion to erect in its place the Wardman Tower residential hotel, which is still standing. Designed by noted architect Mihran Mesrobian, Wardman tower is said to have been home to more U.S. presidents, vice presidents and cabinet members than any other commercial residence in Washington. Other notable residents included actress Marlele Dietrich and Washington's “Hostess with the mostes”, Perl Mesta.

Wardman Tower was also home to embassies, and from its television studios the original broadcasts of “Meet the Press” starting in 1947, and broadcasts of the “Today” show's Washington new bureau and the “Arthur Murray Dance Program.”

By the time Harry Wardman died in 1938, 80,000 Washingtonians — on tenth of the population — lived in homes that were among the 400 apartment buildings and 5,000 houses built by Wardman.

The Woodley Park
Harry Wardman Marker image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, August 16, 2015
2. Harry Wardman Marker
call boxes were developed by the Woodley Park Community Association as part of Art on Call, a program of Cultural Tourism DC with support from the DC Commission on the Arts and Humanities, the Office of the Deputy Mayor for Planning and Economic Development, and the District Department of Transportation. Local support for this call box was provided by the Woodley Park Community Association and Shapiro & Company LLC.
Visit www.woodleypark.org for map and more information.

 
Location. 38° 55.557′ N, 77° 3.328′ W. Marker is in Washington, District of Columbia, in Washington. Marker is on Woodley Road near 27th Street Northwest, on the right when traveling west. Click for map. In front of the Aidan Montessori School at 2700 27th Street Northwest. Marker is in this post office area: Washington DC 20008, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Walsh Memorial (within shouting distance of this marker); Woodley Road Neighbors (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); Long & Winding Woodley Road (approx. 0.2 miles away); From Woodley to Woodley Park (approx. 0.2 miles away); Million Dollar Bridge (approx. 0.2 miles away); Redwood
Harry Wardman image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, August 16, 2015
3. Harry Wardman
Close-up of photo on marker
(approx. mile away); Black and Gray Squirrels (approx. 0.3 miles away); Mihran Mesrobian (approx. 0.3 miles away). Click for a list of all markers in Washington.
 
Categories. Man-Made Features
 
Harry Wardman's House, 1920 image. Click for full size.
W. R. Rose - Library of Congress
4. Harry Wardman's House, 1920
Designed by Albert H. Beers and built by Harry Wardman in 1909 this house was razed in 1928. “ While Mrs. Wardman was in Paris supervising the education of their daughter Helen, Wardman decided to raze his own house for the site of a luxury apartment building, the Wardman Tower.” — James M. Goode Capital Losses.
Wardman Tower image. Click for full size.
Wikipedia
5. Wardman Tower
Designed by Mihran Mesrobian and built by Harry Wardman in 1929.
Wardman Tower Sheathed image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, March 29, 2015
6. Wardman Tower Sheathed
The Wardman Tower is being converted into “32 luxury residences.”
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland. This page has been viewed 185 times since then and 5 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6. submitted on , by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page. This page was last revised on September 7, 2016.
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